Posts by Joseph Antonioli

 
 
 

Friday Links December 14, 2012

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Marginalia, or The Roger Williams Code: How a team of scholars decrypted a secret language—and discovered the last known work of the American theologian. (via Slate)

Ithaka, the non-profit organization that brings us JSTOR, on Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians: This study, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, uncovers the needs of today’s historians and provides guidance for how research support providers can better serve them.

3D Printing:  Wondering what this technology is all about?  Read the latest CQ Researcher report “3D Printing: Will it revolutionize manufacturing?“  Trivia question: How was this technology used in the latest James Bond thriller “Skyfall”?

Some faculty and students have been reluctant to post undergraduate theses to Scholarship at Middlebury in part because they fear it could jeopardize their ability to publish the findings in journals later on. A report published in the Chronicle of Higher Education indicates there isn’t much cause for this kind of concern. (Read the comments too, where the validity of the conclusions is debated.) Putting Dissertation Online Isn’t an Obstacle to Print Publication, Surveys Find.

Friday Links – October 26

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

10 IT Relics I Really Miss – Do you remember the days of BBSes and shareware subscriptions, magazines full of BASIC code for your CoCo, and true desktop cases? Take a techie stroll down memory lane.

Upcoming webinar: Beyond publish or perish: alternative metrics for scholarship presented by NISO.

Moodle Update

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Remote-Learner, the company that hosts Moodle for us, will be performing a minor update at 2am this Saturday. We expect the total downtime to be less than one hour.

Friday Links – October 5

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Advanced planning for Halloween -  The top 10 sci-fi horror films of all time

 

The Final Segue from Segue

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Q: What do these three things have in common?

  • Decommissioning of Segue
  • Shel Sax’s birthday
  • A blue moon

Imagine yourself back in the 2002-2003 academic year. There is no MySpace yet, let alone Facebook, YouTube, or Twitter. Most websites are being created by typing HTML markup or using desktop programs like Dreamweaver. WordPress doesn’t exist yet and won’t support more than a single blog for another three years. Moveable Type and Manilla (early blogging systems) are available, but don’t support the unicode character set needed to properly display text in foreign languages. Each summer numerous faculty would work with students in LIS to build a class website, a process that required many meetings as the faculty member developed the content, then gave it to the student to put on the web. Changes to the content required yet more meetings.

In June 2003 after about a year of development we launched Segue, a content management system that has supported our learning environment for almost a decade. Segue was designed to meet two specific needs. It allowed faculty to create and update their own course websites on their own schedule without requiring a continuous back and forth with support staff. It also allowed web content to be created in all of the languages taught at Middlebury, even Japanese, Chinese, Russian, and Arabic.

Years later unicode support has become common and there now exist a plethora of learning management systems to choose from. In May of 2009, Middlebury decided that Segue had completed it’s tour of duty and that it was time for decommissioning. Today, August 31st, 2012, Segue has served its last page and is now offline.

We want to take this moment to thank Alex Chapin, Adam Franco, Gabe Schine, Christopher Shubert, and Dobromir Radichkov, who developed Segue over the years and supported the service as a resource for our curricular environment.

A: All three occur today.

Friday Links – August 17, 2012

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Five ways that social media can benefit IT – This article focuses on IT as a consumer of social media services, not as a driver in the organization

Considerations for libraries looking at SaaS (Software as a Service).

We’re NASA and we know it.  From Wired, “This music video is the reason nerds rule. Forever.”

Also from Wired: Google’s Dremel makes big data look small.

Friday links – July 6, 2012

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Want to have better meetings? Ditch PowerPoint – For some, a PowerPoint presentation causes them to automatically tune out. Here’s what to do in your meetings instead.

The Classic, Beautiful and Controversial Books That Changed Science Forever - Without the work of intellectual giants like Einstein, Newton and Darwin, we might still be in the dark ages. But how many scientists still read the dust-ridden texts where these luminaries first expounded their theories? Here’s the story of 10 famous publications that spun the scientific world off its orbit.

This just in: Mermaids are NOT real, U.S. agency says