Author Archives: Hannah Benz

Health Professions Shadowing Program

Porter Internship 2016

The Health Professions Program at Middlebury College sponsors a small clinical shadowing program at Porter Hospital and Clinics. As many of you are aware, medical, dental, PA and nursing programs value clinical shadowing in their holistic applicant review, but getting this experience can be tough.

Shadowing Session I will begin in early November 2017 and will continue through the end of JTerm; Session 2 will take place during the Spring Semester.  Students who are selected will be oriented and signed off and then will be allowed to shadow at Porter Hospital and Clinics during their session. Students might, for example, elect to spend a morning with a pediatrician, a day in the operating room, an afternoon with a cardiologist, and a 12 hour shift in the ER. Please indicate which session you would prefer, or if you have no preference.

The application process begins with completion of a simple form; use it as an opportunity to convince us why this experience is important to you! We ask that you not reach out to any Porter provider directly as there are a number of protocols that need to be followed in order for a student to shadow in the hospital. Doing so could jeopardize our affiliation agreement with Porter and result in termination of this beneficial relationship. This opportunity is open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

Interested? Please fill out this form and email it to: hbenz@middlebury.edu. We will accept applications until all slots are filled,  and we typically accept 6 students per session.

Please email Hannah Benz with any questions.

We Need More Doctors With Disabilities

One-fifth of all Americans have a disability, but less than 1 percent of doctors do. That’s slowly starting to change—to the benefit of medicine and patients.

Advances in technology are gradually expanding the pipeline for applicants with disabilities, both creating new means of accommodation and making accommodations that were once too clunky or expensive easier and cheaper.

“Doctors are healers, but they’re also arbiters of what’s normal,” said Temple. They tell us whether our worries are worth the worry. They help us grapple with the fragility of our bodies, the contingency of our lives. We see and hear and walk, but we won’t always. As we age, we are more and more likely to gain a disability—nearly three-quarters of adults over 80 live with one. Doctors with disabilities are not only able to heal us in the same ways as any other doctor; they may be able to help us better understand our bodies and how to live in them.”

Read the full article by Nathan Lohrman in Slate.