Posts by Carrie Macfarlane

 
 
 

Divisional Faculty Advisory Groups – Fall 2012

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Divisional Faculty Advisory Groups meet once or twice per year to discuss library and technology issues and interests. All four groups met in the fall semester. Notes on their discussions are available on the LIS Advisors blog [shortcut: go/lisadvisors]. Here are the links:

Social Sciences
A few highlights: Faculty shared their experiences with curricular and other technology support. Hats off to Kellam, who was praised for her Reserves work!

Sciences
A few highlights: Faculty are interested in reviewing discipline-specific lists of journal subscriptions. Pros and cons of several options for data management were discussed. How best to get more input on faculty preferences? “Send us an email and keep following up if we don’t respond. This is important!”

Arts and Humanities
A few highlights: Faculty shared their answers to the question, “What do faculty most need to know from LIS?” After reviewing statistics on curricular technology use around campus, faculty discussed their continuing need for in-depth support.

Languages
A few highlights: Faculty learned about the two information literacy pilots in progress on campus. The long-term goal is to build out research and technology learning goals within each department. Faculty demonstrated special software that assists with essay grading.

POSTPONED: Liaison Discussion: How to Reach the Uninterested Student

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

***This has been postponed***

Topic: How to Reach the Uninterested Student. Led by Yonna McShane, Director of Learning Resources, CTLR.
Who’s Invited: All liaisons and anyone who might be interested
Who’s “Required”: Primary liaisons, please try to attend if you can. Sorry in advance for any conflicts.
Where and when: Friday, December 14, 10-11 am. Location LIB 201 (Watson Lecture Hall)

Description: Yonna frequently coaches students and faculty on how to improve their presentation skills. She’ll gear this session toward liaisons who lead LIS workshops. How can we “hook” students at the beginning of a workshop so that they stick with us for the whole class period? She will provide tips on handling question and answer sections of the presentation. Yonna also will give tips on professional conference presentations, including visual aids.
***
“Liaison Discussion Section” meetings address research and/or technology topics of interest to liaisons. They can be conversations, or presentations, or both. They take place most often on the 3rd week of the month, but in order to allow people who work different hours to attend, they’re sometimes scheduled for different days/times.

Liaison Discussion: The Portal

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Topic: The Portal. Led by Matt LaFrance.
Who’s Invited: All liaisons and anyone who might be interested
When and where: Thursday, November 29, 10:30-11:30 am. LIB 105.

Description: This is an opportunity to reflect on the Portal (http://go.middlebury.edu/portal) and review its place amongst our services. Matt LaFrance, the maintainer of the project, will present on its development, features, and intended purpose. Afterward there will be time for questions and discussion.

******************
“Liaison Discussion Section” meetings address research and/or technology topics of interest to liaisons. They can be conversations, or presentations, or both. They take place most often on the 3rd week of the month, but in order to allow people who work different hours to attend, they’re sometimes scheduled for different days/times.

Liaison Discussion: Increasing student participation in our workshops

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Topic: Increasing student participation in our workshops. Led by Richard Jenkins, Joy Pile, Wendy Shook, and Carrie Macfarlane.
Who’s Invited: All liaisons and anyone who might be interested
When and where: Monday, October 29, 9:30-10:30 am. LIB 145.

Description: We’ve all been trying new techniques to make our classes more interactive. Richard, Joy, Wendy and Carrie will share some of their recent attempts, then turn the floor over to the group for discussion. Come ready to tell others about your own ideas, whether you’ve tested them in the classroom or not. Why? Here are at least 10 reasons, and when we meet, I’m sure we’ll come up with more. Bring a laptop if you’d like to try out one of our polls.

******************
“Liaison Discussion Section” meetings address research and/or technology topics of interest to liaisons. They can be conversations, or presentations, or both. They take place most often on the 3rd week of the month, but in order to allow people who work different hours to attend, they’re sometimes scheduled for different days/times.

Stressed out?

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Notes from “Stress, Your Brain, & Productivity,” a go/learning workshop led by Porter Knight, Productivity Vermont, October 10, 2012.

The main point of the workshop was that understanding how your brain responds to stress can allow you to improve your health and increase your productivity. Apparently, LIS is sometimes not the most tranquil place to work. LISers comprised a good portion of the audience!  Here’s what we learned.

When bad things (surprise deadlines, dissatisfied customers, arguments with colleagues…) occur, here’s what happens:

  • blood leaves prefrontal cortex, and decision-making skills falter
  • brain applies a filter that encourages you to see everything in a negative light; focus of attention narrows, prevents you from “zooming out” and seeing alternatives
  • you become preoccupied and may “check out” causing you to miss important details and info
  • blood flows to the memory/emotion part of your brain, causing you to make accidental connections that are not helpful
  • compromised health due to elevated levels of adrenalin & cortisol
  • brain is chemically dumbed down, forgetfulness for example

One solution: Organization. Create a safety net so that when bad things happen, you have tools in place that help you recover.

What about that bloodflow issue? Acknowledge, then choose to act. This actually reverses the bloodflow! Say, “I’m experiencing stress. Now I choose to…Take a deep breath, use a calm voice, shake it off, spend only 10 more minutes…”  It may help to plan ahead and “write a script” of such responses to have at-the-ready.

The brain uses a lot of energy — “each decision gets harder” because you’ve used up juice.  Here’s how you can fight “brain drain”:

  • Feed it! Eat breakfast, lunch
  • Exercise helps the brain too. It feeds oxygen into the bloodstream, and oxygen carries away the brain’s “trash” (free radicals)
  • Be aware of how your brain functions — save heavy-thinking tasks for times when you’re well-nourished and well-exercised.
  • Schedule times for your intentions & recharging so they will actually happen!
  • Protect yourself by communicating your plan to others.
  • Don’t forget to evaluate your actions for effectiveness.

Solution Summary:

  • Get organized
  • Be mindful — choose/decide.
  • Schedule & protect your intentions.
  • Connect!  Smile.  Put on your friend filter so others are more likely to view you as approachable.

Books:

His Holiness the Dalai Lama at the Davis Family Library

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Photos on the LIS Facebook page courtesy of Joseph Watson!

 

Find LIS on Facebook and Twitter

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Facebook icon

Since we got ourselves on Facebook and Twitter over a year ago, more than 220 students, faculty, staff, organizations and colleagues have ‘liked’ and ‘followed’ us. More are always welcome! Find us on Facebook at Middlebury College LIS, and on Twitter at @MiddLibrarian.

We wondered recently how we were doing. Should we go to other social networking sites? Are we posting useful news? What else do students want to know about? We polled our student workers and learned that most importantly, we need to make sure everyone knows we’re out there!  Facebook and Twitter still seem to be the most popular forums, and our content seems good.

To help us keep spreading the news, Mike Lynch (Systems Administrator) has joined us as a social media community manager. Great job this month, Mike!

We’re asked periodically by LIS staff members how to get info posted to the LIS Facebook page. The easiest way is to post it to the LIS blog. We’ll notice it, and we’ll either share it right away, or we’ll decide to share it later. (We now use the ShareThis plugin, and we have a planning calendar so that we don’t over-post.) Alternatively, send an email to Steve Bertolino, Mike Lynch, and Carrie Macfarlane and we’ll make a note of your request.