Weekly Web Updates – May 30, 2016

Updates

Tweaks and Fixes

  • A recent update to MediaWiki caused an error when looking at the difference between revisions, which we’ve now fixed.
  • The “GObacktionary” now lists GO shortcuts alphabetically by URL.
  • Fixed an issue where the term lookup for new MiddFiles resources in the Course Hub wasn’t working.
  • Canvas Resources in the Course Hub for the Language Schools course sites now auto-update.
  • Sub-page lists on the Middlebury Drupal site, like the table of content for the Handbook, where more than one level of the site tree is displayed will now indicate the depth of a page in the tree using indentation.
  • Several photo syncing issues with the Athletics History Wall were resolved.
  • All of our Drupal sites can now store user names up to 254 characters in length, increased from the default length of 60 characters.

Notes for Panopto Proposal May 24, 2016

  • There is a proposal to pilot Panopto for one year with existing funds. This will not be a comparison pilot. We have looked at Panopto (demos 1 and 2), Arc, and Ensemble. Arc is still in beta and not viable to use in pilot. Based on our research, it seems like we can do the most with Panopto (content capture, lecture capture, streaming). Feedback from other schools: faculty are using it themselves with little help. We have determined through research that Panopto is best of breed and affordable. The ACTT team supports the video streaming recommendation.
  • Panopto would be available for one year. The recommendation on continuing will need to be made after the first semester. If we recommend Panopto, we should also recommend a term for continuing (e.g., 3 years).
  • Is this a pilot or a staged rollout? Using the term pilot might be most appropriate, helps educate users on the process we use to evaluate systems, and gives us flexibility if we decide not to adopt it. It also clarifies the support expectations and how new to all of us this service is. Pilots are often considered to be part of staged rollouts. A pilot was planned as part of the MediaCore rollout. Team tentatively agreed to consider this an open pilot in the Fall with a more widespread rollout in the Spring, pending the decision at the end of the pilot.
  • MiddMedia will be available through the pilot.
  • The focus of the pilot will be academics and instruction. We are also interested in testing out its streaming capacity for events.
  • Parameters of the pilot will be determined later. Will it be limited to specific classes or openly available? Should we limit it to instructional needs or to other use cases? Who should we reach out to specifically? We might set up workshops or intro videos to introduce the product. What model should we adopt as far as the contract is concerned? Enterprise (more expensive) or limited license (more management and limited use). Team felt it should be made available to the entire community.
  • Should it be hooked into Course Hub during the pilot? (Anticipation of one and half months of calendar time / 1-2 weeks of work to integrate, similar to Canvas.) May be better to integrate to avoid messy cleanup with accounts if Panopto is adopted. Classes begin at Monterey during the 3rd week of August. June: begin integrating with Course Hub. Could Panopto set up a test account for Web Technology to tinker with?
  • How to create shared libraries? Automatic provisioning or by request only? Who has permissions? Suggestion to have a request form to make sure the appropriate conversations happen in each case.
  • We’ll need to determine an exit strategy if we don’t adopt Panopto.
  • We’ll need to come up with criteria for evaluation. Asset management capability will need to be assessed during the pilot. What are our needs in this area? How will we organize our directories and assign permissions? How will we assess this?
  • End of June: establish contract with Panopto.

Feedback from other colleges

Skidmore, Hamilton College, Holy Cross, Lake Forrest, and Gettysburg.

Skidmore and Hamilton are using Panopto and Ensemble for different purposes. Panopto for lecture capturing and Ensemble for video asset management. Both are happy with both products and say they are easy to use.

Holy Cross has been using Panopto for the last 2 years and they are happy with it.

Gettysburg College has been using Ensemble since the summer of 2014. It is used primarily to store videos for their library reserves (75%) and the rest for faculty created content (mostly flipped classrooms). For the most part happy with it.

Lake Forest College has had Panopto for 2 years and are pretty happy with the decision. Several faculty have done a lot of screen-casting, and they were able to get started with minimal hand-holding.

Graduation Traditions: Cane Ceremony

In the 1940s, a revival in interest in Gamaliel Painter, one of Middlebury’s founders and early benefactors, saw the birth of a new graduation tradition. During convocation ceremonies at Middlebury’s former Women’s College, graduates began passing down replicas of Painter’s cane to the junior class. Today, every Middlebury graduate receives such a replica to keep as a symbol of their alma mater and with which to tap along when “Gamaliel Painter’s Cane” is sung at reunion.

This compilation of 16mm film footage from the college archives shows the cane-passing ceremony as part of convocation processions in the 1940s held behind Forest Hall.

 

Find out more about the story of Painter’s cane and its place in Middlebury history in The Story of Middlebury’s Cane Tradition a video created by the College’s own Chris Spencer, Stephen Diehl, Benjamin Savard ’14, and Matthew Lennon ’13.

 

@MiddInfoSec: Information Security’s ‘Security Scout of the Month’

To help raise awareness about community efforts to prevent significant security issues, Middlebury Information Security has launched a ‘Security Scout of the Month’ award.

Highlighting the valuable contributions of community security scouts in an @MiddInfoSec blog post and on Middlebury’s Information Security web site is a great way to show how a cautious and thoughtful approach to computing can protect the College community from cyber risks. In addition, recipients will receive a twenty-five dollar Amazon gift card.

As an example, this past month, an attack against Middlebury’s Banner system was avoided thanks to the contributions of an astute member of our community, Justin Allen, who spotted a targeted phishing attack and raised the awareness around this malicious event.

As Justin Allen describes it:

     “I received an email that started out dear account owner which usually gets my attention and as I read down thru the email I noticed that it said I had signed up for a paperless W-2 which I did not and it wanted me to logon to view it. After that I noticed a couple of another things that did not make sense for my Middlebury account one was the sender of the email which wasn’t from the college at all and we all have been told time and time again if the address doesn’t end with middlebury.edu it’s not from the college. Below is a copy of what was sent to me.”

This astute awareness is why Justin is this month’s ‘Security Scout of the Month’.

We are excited to celebrate the hard work and security conscious efforts of our community. Please watch for the next ‘Security Scout of the Month’ and help us recognize these efforts.

If you would like to recognize an individual for their information security contributions or would like to raise an information security concern, please contact infosec@middlebury.edu.

Graduation Traditions: Pipe Smoking

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Two graduates eagerly take part in Middlebury’s bygone pipe smoking tradition

Just as coming across full page ads for Chesterfield cigarettes used to be part and parcel of reading the latest edition of The Campus, pipe smoking was once a traditional part of Middlebury’s graduation festivities. Dating back to at least the 1920s during the “Class Day” activities that preceded commencement, graduates would gather outside to take puffs on long white pipes (sometimes lit by proud parents) before heading off to the alumni barbecue.

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Pipe-smoking graduates in 1942

This compilation of 16mm film footage from the College Archives captures the pipe smoking tradition from the late 1920s to mid-40s. Although even those graduates who coughed through the smoke appear to have had a swell time, the annual tradition eventually ended in what we can only assume was the interest of public health.

 

 

Mead Chapel Centenary: Then & Now Pt. II

In celebration of the 100 year anniversary of the completion of Mead Chapel and Hepburn Hall, Special Collections presents a series of posts featuring interactive before-and-after imagery of these Middlebury icons.

Below is an interactive slider with images of Mead from the archives (tap or drag the bar to the right and left to slide between images). The before image was taken in 1942 while the after image shows the chapel and the surrounding (or should we say obscuring) landscape as it looks today.

 

A new 48-rank chamber organ was installed in Mead Chapel in 1970 after the condition of the original had deteriorated beyond repair. Music director Emory Fanning recalled that at the start of one performance on the dilapidated instrument, 12-inch blue flames had shot out of the motor before it was turned off, a prayer for the dead was recited, and it was turned back on for the remainder of the performance — which continued without a hitch.

The interactive slider below shows the dramatic presence that the new organ holds in Mead, having covered up the window above the altar. The before image is a 1919 postcard showing the interior of the chapel while the after image shows how it looks today. Other changes include balcony seating and updated lighting fixtures.

 

Sources
The Organ in the Chapel.” Middlebury College News Letter, July 1, 1969.
A12 PF Mead 1942 02,  Special Collections & Archives, Middlebury College
A12 PF Mead 1919 01,  Special Collections & Archives, Middlebury College

New Special Collections exhibits just in time for summer!

Currently populating the glass cases of Davis Family Library are Margaret Armstrong book covers and historic postcards. Don’t miss the chance to see them before heading out for the summer!

As part of American Studies professor Ellery Foutch’s AMST 101 course, American Holidays, students researched holiday postcards from our collection, exploring how symbols and themes reflect the cultural mores of turn-of-the-century American life.

The postcards they studied and their comments are on display in the library atrium.

To compliment this exhibit, college archivist Danielle Rougeau curated and designed an exhibit featuring postcards and scrapbooks from the archives. The postcards capture Middlebury College’s landscape and characters as well as the role of postcard correspondence through history.

Postcard from Marjorie Phelps, class of 1917, to her mother. As she mentions, she and her roommate are pictured on the reverse.
Postcard from Marjorie Phelps, class of 1917, to her mother. As she mentions, she and her roommate are pictured on the reverse.

Rounding out our summer exhibits is a tribute to Margaret Armstrong, curated by Joseph Watson and designed by Danielle Rougeau. Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944), one of the most accomplished book cover designers of the early twentieth century, produced cover art and illustrations for over 270 books.

Come to Special Collections to see a selection of her cover designs and learn more about her life!

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Can you tell which cover Margaret Armstrong didn’t design? Come to Special Collections for a closer look and the answer!

 

Middlebury will Adopt Canvas

In January, 2016, the ACTT (formerly CTT) submitted a recommendation for Middlebury to adopt Canvas. We have received budget approval, and will begin the work of moving Middlebury into the Canvas service.

Thank you to all of the faculty and students that participated in the pilot. Your participation and feedback (Midd and MIIS) helped to make a strong recommendation. And thank you to Joe Antonioli, Bob Cole, Bill Koulopoulos, Stacy Reardon, Shel Sax and Heather Stafford for supporting these classes during the pilot.

Also, thank you to all of the schools that provided us with insight and the benefit of their experience with Canvas. We learned a lot from you.

There is a lot of work still to be done to move Canvas from pilot to enterprise, but we do hope that you take a moment to celebrate this milestone and the collective effort to get to this point.