Category Archives: Post for MiddPoints

Bye-bye Summon, Hello LibrarySearch

LibrarySearch allows you to search our catalog of physical books and all our digital resources at the same time.

The Library has hundreds of databases, indexes and catalogs, providing access to millions of articles, books, films, musical recordings and primary sources.  That sounds promising… until it sounds overwhelming. Where should you start your research? We used to recommend Summon, but over the summer, we replaced Summon with LibrarySearch.  

Like its predecessor Summon, LibrarySearch is a great place to begin your research.  That’s because LibrarySearch links you to nearly everything in our collections. And, we think LibrarySearch is even better than Summon at matching results to your search terms.

We’re still straightening out some of the kinks with our new discovery service.  For example, LibrarySearch is linking to materials at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, and it is not linking to many of our online newspapers. So as always, please get in touch with a librarian if you’re not finding what you need.

Next time you’re starting a research project, try LibrarySearch! Look for it at the center of the Library home page, or at go.middlebury.edu/librarysearch

Deaccessioning Project Formally Begins

This fall, the Library will be starting a multi-year review of our circulating monograph collection in Davis Family Library that will identify titles we can safely remove from our collection. The project was discussed with department heads and chairs last spring. A web guide is available with much more information, including definition of the materials under review (spoiler alert: only circulating books, and nothing else). We are doing this for several reasons:

  1. The Davis Family Library’s shelves are functionally full. While you’ll see empty or partially filled shelves in places, a library needs to keep roughly 20% of its shelf space clear in order to reshelve and shift books, which is necessary when we acquire new materials.
  2. The collection has not been systematically reviewed as a whole in decades, and we have on our shelves materials that are outdated, superseded, and/or no longer relevant to Middlebury’s academic program.
  3. The library is short on study rooms and other usable spaces for students and faculty.

The process will be deliberative and consultative, and we invite your participation. Here is how the process will unfold:

  1. We have analyzed the 600,000 titles in Davis Family Library and automatically marked for retention titles that were recently acquired or heavily used, or which we must retain due to our consortial obligations. This reduced the number of titles under consideration for withdrawal to 229,000. 
  2. We have created a website (Monograph Deselection Project) that lists all of the titles under consideration, organized by subject, where you can see details about each title, including its usage history, date of publication, and more.
  3. Starting this fall, librarians will review the titles under consideration for withdrawal, and will make preliminary decisions about which titles to remove.
  4. As these preliminary reviews are completed, we will share with departments and other interested faculty our recommendations on which titles to remove, and provide you a chance to weigh in.
  5. Some materials may be moved into Special Collections if they have acquired an historical or other kind of value, rather than being withdrawn outright.

We’ll conduct these reviews in batches over the course of the next few years. Your Library Liaison will let you know when collections pertinent to your academic field(s) are under review. Because many faculty teach and do research in areas outside their departmental homes, we also invite those who wish to review any particular subjects to let us know via http://go.middlebury.edu/listrequest so that we can inform you when that subject is being reviewed.

Collection review is a critical part of the work of sustaining a vital, vibrant, and relevant print collection. While we recognize that it is daunting to make hard decisions about the importance of hundreds of thousands of titles, we have created, with useful help from consultations with chairs and with our advisory committee, what we think is a simple and straightforward process that provides you with the opportunity to give us valuable input into these decisions. Again, much more information is available on the project’s web guide.

Please let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

ITS Tech Services Overview Offered October 9 – for New (or not-so-new) Hires

Information Technology Services (ITS) offers a monthly workshop with recent hires in mind called “ITS & You:  Technology Services Overview.”  The next session will be held Wednesday, October 9 at 9:00 a.m.  We’ll introduce services and resources provided by ITS to all Middlebury campus employees, including:  account security, online learning, file storage, how to obtain computing help, and more.  The workshop format will be a presentation with questions entertained along the way, followed by an optional half hour for hands-on assistance with specific questions.

To sign up, please use our online form.  Although geared toward new or recent hires, everyone is welcome to attend – you might surprise yourself with an “aha” moment or two.

Next month’s session will be held on Wednesday, November 20 at 1:30 pm.  Our complete workshop schedule can be viewed at http://go/techworkshops/.

Announcing the New Library Website

New library website
Home page of the new library website

You’re right, things look a little different this week! We’re excited to announce the launch of our new library website. We’ve streamlined and reorganized our content, and we’re now mobile-friendly! We hope it’ll be even easier for you to find what you need, and to discover useful and inspiring resources that you didn’t even know to ask for.

Please note that the site, though live, is not quite in its final form. We’ll be making minor upgrades and revisions in the coming weeks.

Many thanks to the Library Website User Experience Team, Library Website authors, and, last but not least, our colleagues at the Office of Communications!

Now, go ahead and update your bookmarks to point to: http://go.middlebury.edu/lib . We’ll see you there!

Stewart Lane portrait photo

Goodbye Stewart Lane!

Stewart Lane is retiring on June 14th, after 25+ years of service!
Stewart has been the real embodiment of a Media Services and ITS staff. Courteous, expedient and willing to take on any task, from helping a faculty with their laptop in a classroom, to screening Hirschfield films on late nights, to running a video camera, to supervising our students, to redesigning a classroom and programming lighting systems. He’s been a real go-getter, with a can-do attitude! I can’t count the emails and other positive feedback that I’ve received for him from customers over the years.

Stewart would like to thank Norm Cushman and Bryan Merril for giving him a job and a chance to become part of Middlebury back in the 90s.

We will miss you dearly Stewart, especially your dedication to work, as well as your cheer and lightheartedness.

A tip of the hat to Stewart!

Some of the kind words of thanks that Stewart has received over the years:

  • …phenomenal! #epic…
  • Thank you for your swift and diligent support. This was an excellent service provided.
  • “…incredible effort you have put in to get ready for this year’s Fest. There are so many fabulous films that are screening at Dana…”
  • It’s been great working with you over the years…
  • Many thanks for the timely save yesterday–I’m glad you and Jen remained unflappable.
  • took a lot of pressure off of my shoulders.
  • terrific
  • We’re very fortunate here to get such personal attention from you and other Support staff!!
  • thank you for your help and patience
  • thank you again very much for going above and beyond the call of duty
    heartfelt thanks to you
  • It’s a pleasure to work with such professional and capable colleague
  • thank you for saving me last week with that screening
  • Thank you SO much for being patient with the laptop and us, non-techies.

Customer Purchases of Technology

Great news!  College faculty and staff can purchase many computer peripherals directly through Oracle Finance purchasing system.  Purchasing with this new system gives you the ability to price, budget, order, and directly receive items.  In addition, you will be able to track shipping and confirm charges are correct. We are here to guide, and recommend items you might be looking for; feel free to give us a call or email the ITS Helpdesk.  The Middlebury College Bookstore also has many accessory items in stock and can direct you to what will work for your setup.  

PURCHASE THROUGH ITS

Although you can purchase your own office peripherals, cables, and such, please remember you must work with ITS on purchases of computers, tablets, specialty monitors, and printers, as well as projectors, network switches, software, and TVs.  This will ensure you receive educational discounts, proper licensing, and appropriate warranties on college-supported equipment.  College funded computer purchases must be coordinated with Information Technology Services (ITS) prior to ordering, so ITS may review the specifications to ensure the equipment is compatible with the Middlebury College environment plus confirm in-house support is available.  For example, there are items ITS does not support, like departmentally purchased printers, or non-standard model computers.

PURCHASE ON YOUR OWN

We have put together a list of common accessories our campus customers have requested and we have tested.  Because items come and go in availability, and pricing changes, this list may go out of date.  Like I said, feel free to check in with the Middlebury College Bookstore or with us at the ITS Helpdesk, we are here to help.

Adobe Creative Cloud 2019: Available in Labs by June

Adobe logo

Adobe Creative Cloud 2018 is being replaced with version 2019 in the computer labs this June of 2019. New integration with the Adobe Cloud in CC 2019 may eventually bring exciting developments, allowing cloud storage of documents and settings, as well as access to some applications that rely on the cloud to run. Syncing to the cloud is not currently enabled in the computer labs.

What this means to you: when opening an Adobe Creative Cloud application on a lab computer, you will be prompted to log into Adobe. Faculty, staff, and students of Middlebury’s degree programs may use their Middlebury account credentials. If/when prompted, choose the option to sign in with an “Enterprise ID.” You may also opt to use a personal Adobe ID for this purpose, if you prefer. They are free and easy to set up.

Faculty and Staff of the undergraduate college and the institute may be interested in the installation options outlined in our past blog post about Adobe CC 2019 availability.

Mental Health Awareness Month

Literatures and Cultures Librarian Katrina Spencer interviews Madeline “Maddie” Hope, the Assistant Director of Health & Wellness Education, for Mental Health Awareness Month. Visit the Davis Family Library to engage with a thematic display on this topic. Credits go to Dr. Raquel Albarrán of the Department of Luso-Hispanic Studies and students Jayla Johnson, Class of 2021, and Myles Maxie, Class of 2022, for the display’s design. Special thanks to Barbara Walter, Kat Cyr, Laura Kearley and Joseph Watson.

Professor Raquel Albarrán, Myles Maxie and Librarian Katrina Spencer pose with the Mental Health Awareness Month Display.
Professor Raquel Albarrán, Myles Maxie, Class of 2022, and Literatures & Cultures Librarian Katrina Spencer set up the Mental Health Awareness Month Display in the Davis Family Library lobby.

Katrina Spencer (KS): Hi, who are you? How long have you been here? What do you do on campus?

Maddie Hope (MH): Hi! I’m Maddie Hope. I’ve worked at Middlebury since July of 2018. I am a Health Educator, which means I provide trainings, one-on-one discussions and programs about topics related to health and wellness for students. My areas of focus are mental health, alcohol use and cannabis use. Come visit me in the Health and Wellness Education Office on the second floor of the Service Building. We have a massage chair!

Assistant Director of Health & Wellness Education Maddie Hope provides answers to important questions.

KS: What do you know about the display in the Davis Family Library?

MH: I know the display is focused on decreasing stigma related to discussing mental health challenges and providing different resources that can be accessed for support.

KS: Why is it important to reduce stigma surrounding mental health and illness?

MH: So often when people are struggling with mental health, they are also having a hard time connecting to themselves or others and stigma, or judgment, can make this problem worse. Stigma about mental health and mental illness is often the largest barrier to seeking support and feeling understood. These are two of the most important curative factors for mental health challenges. When we seek to understand the challenges others are facing rather than meeting them with judgment, we pave the way for healing.

KS: What resources are available on campus? To students? Staff? Faculty?

MH: For students, there is the Parton Center for Health and Wellness. Students can choose to speak to a counselor or a health care provider for mental health support. To make an appointment with a counselor, students can call 802-443-5141, or visit their office on the third floor of Centeno House. You can also read about counseling staff on campus at go/counseling/. If students are interested in meeting with a health care provider, they can call 802-443-3290, or visit their office on the first floor of Centeno House to make an appointment.

For staff and faculty, Human Resources provides a confidential service called Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP) which can provide short-term counseling services on a variety of topics and serve as a referral source for more long term services. More information can be found at go/EFAP/ or by inquiring with Human Resources.

KS: Are there any mental health counselors of color? And if not, what can community members do when they are seeking cultural familiarity and competency in their mental health care services?

MH: The Counseling staff at Middlebury is predominantly white-identified, but the counseling center is commiting to actively recruiting counselors of a variety of racial and ethnic backgrounds.

This can certainly be a challenge. Community members have a few options here. It might be valuable to consider beginning an online counseling relationship. It may be helpful to search for a clinician in your home community or in Burlington, VT. Some counselors may be open to meeting completely online, or have a few sessions in person and then offer online appointments.

A few resources for finding a therapist who can provide cultural familiarity include:

a screenshot of Therapy for Black Girls
A screenshot from the online directory Therapy for Black Girls

For additional reading and listening about how mental health challenges can be different for people of color consider the following:

KS: Thank you for those resources above. How might the Health and Wellness Education Office and the Libraries collaborate in reducing the stigma surrounding mental health?

MH: Often the library can be a place students experience many overwhelming emotions (e.g. feeling fatigued from studying, experiencing frustration or hopelessness about assignments or workload). I can see some exciting potential to explore having consistent stress management events in the library for students, faculty and staff to enjoy. Providing opportunities to explore strategies to address overwhelming emotions together helps to show support for those who may have a hard time discussing mental health challenges with others.

KS: Brilliant. Thank you for your time. Students, keep a look out for the Health & Wellness Education’s Stressbusters Calendar out May 6th!