Category Archives: Post for MiddNotes

Poster Printing in the Wilson Media Lab

At a certain point in the semester the digital media tutors and I begin to develop a love/hate relationship with our plotter. Everyone loves the ability to create and print large scale graphic representations of our work but we hate the error messages, ink stripes, and “Plotter is down” signs on the doorway to the lab.

Finals week spring term 2014. Not a pretty day for the plotter.

Finals week spring term 2014. Not a pretty day for the plotter.

Like any piece of mechanical equipment that is heavily used, the plotter will occasionally break. Although we usually have no warning when this is about to happen, there are a few things that everyone can do to help us tame the plotter.

Professors –

  • Send an email to library-at@middlebury.edu to notify us of the timeframe when your students will be working on and printing poster projects. (The earlier – the better! First week of class = PERFECT!) If you can send us a copy of the assignment – even better!
  • Be sure your students know how to use the best tools to create a poster. (A lot of students come to the lab with PowerPoint files that can be challenging to scale correctly. We recommend using Illustrator and provide docs for how to do this too!) Faculty can also request a poster tutorial session for their class by submitting a helpdesk ticket here.  
  • If you are requiring posters for your class and want your department to cover the cost of poster printing follow these instructions early in the semester.

Students –

  • Don’t underestimate the amount of time it takes to create a visual piece of work. It might seem like it will come together faster than a paper, but often there is just one component that you can’t get to look just right, or a feature in Illustrator that is not working the way you expected.
  • Make an appointment with a digital media tutor if you need help with more than a couple of questions. This will allow us to dedicate more time focused on you rather than reloading paper and ink in the plotter and helping everyone else in the lab. (We’ll schedule another tutor to do that.)
  • Fully proof your poster on the screen before sending the file to print on the plotter.

Everyone

Recycle your scraps and remember that advanced planning is often the key to success!

 

@MiddInfoSec – New Phishing Threat

Information Security has become aware of a new phishing threat with a subject line of “ITS Help-desk”. Please see below for the full content of this attack. Note this email is a hoax and should be deleted from your email. Do not reply to this message and do not click any links in this message. If you have any questions please feel free to contact the help desk at x2200 or forward the message to phishing@middlebury.edu.

phish

Important reminders to spot a phish include:

  1. Read the entire email from start to finish to ensure that the content and language fits with the sender.
  2. Hover your mouse over links to ensure the link directs you to the destination indicated by the email.
  3. Look for misplaced language, such as copyrights or signatures, that do not match the sender.

For additional information on phishing please visit http://go.middlebury.edu/phish

Friday Links – February 12, 2016

The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) are jointly releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2016 Higher Education Edition at the 2016 ELI Annual Meeting. This 13th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.
[Watch the video summary]

@MiddInfoSec: Information Security RoadShow: 2/23/2016

Plan ahead for a lunch and learn RoadShow. On February 23rd, 2016 ITS-Information Security will be hosting a RoadShow conversation on safe computing practices and phishing avoidance techniques in Lib145 from 12:00 to 1:00. This conversation is open to the entire Middlebury community. All are encouraged to come.

Topics include:

  • How to spot a phish
  • Safe download practices and installing applications on your computer
  • Data classification and sensitive data
  • Removable media and when to use it
  • Password management and what to do with all of those passwords

 

Follow ITS-Information Security on Twitter: @MiddInfoSec

@MiddInfoSec: Guard Your Privacy When Offline or Traveling

Information Security has a new Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at @MiddInfosec or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

Planning a spring break vacation or work-related travel? People are frequently more vulnerable when traveling because a break from their regular routine or encounters with unfamiliar situations often result in less cautious behavior. If this sounds like you, or someone you know, these five tips will help you protect yourself and guard your privacy.

  • Track that device! Install a device finder or manager on your mobile device in case it’s lost or stolen. Make sure it has remote wipe capabilities.
  • Avoid social media announcements about your travel plans. It’s tempting to share your upcoming vacation plans with family and friends, but consider how this might make you an easier target for local or online thieves. While traveling, avoid using social media to “check in” to airports and consider posting those beautiful photos after you return home. Find out how burglars are using your vacation posts to target you in this infographic.
  • Traveling soon? If you’re traveling with a laptop or mobile device, make sure it is secured with strong authentication and avoid traveling with (or if you must, encrypt) confidential information.
  • Limit the amount of personal and/or sensitive information stored on your devices. Locate, secure, (or better yet) remove PII (personally identifiable information) such as your SSN, credit card numbers, and/or bank account information, and do not travel with unencrypted confidential Middlebury information on your devices.
  • Physically protect yourself and your devices. Use a laptop lock, avoid unnecessarily displaying identification cards, shred sensitive paperwork before you recycle it, and watch out for “shoulder surfers” at ATM’s or while using your devices in public places.

These are just some of the many things that you can do to travel more safely! For more information about information security, visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec.

Much of this content comes from the Awareness and Training Working Group of the EDUCAUSE Higher Education Information Security Council (HEISC) and is then tailored for the Middlebury community.

Canvas Adoption Proposal

Below is the official proposal for the adoption of Canvas, crafted and submitted by the Curricular Technology Team. Many faculty, students and staff contributed to the pilot that informed the proposal, we sincerely appreciate everyone’s efforts. There are a couple of notes about the proposal: The proposal assumes that the Canvas budget request will still...

[Continue reading]

Protect Your Privacy

Information Security has a New Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at #MiddInfosec or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

You and your information are everywhere. When you’re online you leave a trail of “digital exhaust” in the form of cookies, GPS data, social network posts, and e-mail exchanges, among others. It is critical to learn how to protect yourself and guard your privacy. Your identity and even your bank account could be at risk!

  • Use long and complex passwords or passphrases. These are often the first line of defense in protecting an online account. The length and complexity of your passwords can provide an extra level of protection for your personal information.
  • Take care what you share. Periodically check the privacy settings for your social networking apps to ensure that they are set to share only what you want, with whom you intend. Be very careful about putting personal information online. What goes on the Internet¬¬ usually stays on the Internet.
  • Go stealth when browsing. Your browser can store quite a bit of information about your online activities, including cookies, cached pages, and history. To ensure the privacy of personal information online, limit access by going “incognito” and using the browser’s private mode.
  • Using Wi-Fi? If only public Wi-Fi is available, restrict your activity to simple searches (no banking!) or use a VPN (virtual private network). The latter provides an encrypted tunnel between you and the sites you visit.
  • Should you trust that app? Only use apps from reputable sources. Check out reviews from users or other trusted sources before downloading anything that is unfamiliar.