Category Archives: Middlebury Community Interest

Visions of the Apocalypse

Representations of the Apocalypse

During the Fall 2017 semester we worked with Professor Patricia Saldarriaga’s FYSE 1500A: Apocalyptic Representations class. The course explored theories and representations of “apocalyptic imagination” across many forms of media, including virtual reality. On Thursday, December 14th, students from the class gathered in the lobby of the Davis Family Library to present their final projects, virtual worlds representing the Apocalypse.

We recommend coming to the Library and immersing yourself in these worlds using the Oculus in LIB 240B. The worlds can also be explored using an up-to-date web3d-enabled browser. Here are some samples of the students’ work, along with links to all of the presented projects.

 

https://poly.google.com/view/73PRDSDa_dT

https://poly.google.com/view/4s_u7L6olPR

https://poly.google.com/view/2qDVZDLSCs0

https://poly.google.com/view/8d0u7LQnGHU

https://poly.google.com/view/1BmyJ1MldbF

https://poly.google.com/view/2ouipfvs5fd

https://poly.google.com/view/0FOFk4xAiyB

Interlibrary Loan Winter Break Service Update – 2017

Due to the holidays, shipping madness, the increased risk of losses, and the lack of open libraries willing to send things, the Interlibrary Loan Department limits ordering and shipping during the second half of December.

If you need anything before winter break request it now!  Interlibrary loan requests submitted to ILLiad after Dec. 15th will be ordered in early January.

ILLiad article requests will continue to be filled by RapidILL through Dec. 22st, but requests must have a valid ISSN and year to be processed by Rapid.

Use Worldcat to find your citations and submit your loan requests!

 

Throwback Thursday: Zach Schuetz

 

Some of the employees working within the libraries once had other roles and separate affiliations with Middlebury. Follow their (r)evolutions on the first Thursday of every month this semester.

Name: Zach Schuetz  

Former Role(s) on Campus: Class of 2011, Japanese Major, Linguistics Minor; Japanese Language School 2009

Current Role on Campus: Senior Technology Specialist; Advisor, Xenia Social House

When was this photo taken? Fall 2008, at the Quidditch World Cup (then hosted in Middlebury.)

What were you doing in this photo?

Just observing, though in other years I competed or performed with the Mountain Ayres for the halftime show.

How have things changed in your life since then? I’ve gained a lot of perspective on what I want out of life and what I’m willing to do to get there. For example, I love teaching, so at the time I was planning to be a college professor. But I’m not that excited about doing original research, so instead I found a position where I still get to teach and answer questions, but in a less formal setting, and without the stress of grad school and adjunct hell.

What hasn’t? I still speak Japanese sometimes, and I still enjoy watching anime, playing tabletop games, and attending events at Xenia. I also wear my wizard hat to work on special occasions.

What’s your favorite thing about your job? The satisfaction of solving a difficult puzzle, helping students and faculty do all the awesome things they do (both in an IT context and at Xenia), and getting to live and work in the wonderful community at Midd.

What is on the horizon? Getting more involved with the community and seeking social and romantic opportunities here and in Burlington. Paying off student loans and saving up for a down payment on a house so I can start to think about settling down.

For more posts like these, like our Facebook page.

MIDCAT v. Summon, a tale of two systems

image of woman

Literatures & Cultures Librarian Katrina Spencer has a few words to share about MIDCAT and Summon.

This is Katrina Spencer, the Literatures & Cultures Librarian and this post is for everyone who uses MIDCAT and Summon to navigate library resources. At this point in the semester, however, the message is primarily for students. Students, as you prepare for your end-of-year assignments, I want to tell you a bit about how I use both MIDCAT and Summon differently. If you speak to another librarian, you will likely get a whole new set of ideas, interpretations and uses, which is good and enriching. Take a look below to see my impressions and visit the rest of the team at the Research Desk for more conversation on this topic.

MIDCAT ~ Will provide results for library materials including print books, e-books, DVDs, CDs, VHS, government documents, sheet music, microfilm and microfiche, and a variety of technological equipment held in Davis Family Library, Armstrong Library in Bicentennial Hall, Davison Library at Bread Loaf, Twilight, etc.

When I use MIDCAT…

  • I am searching for a specific item (usually a book, DVD or CD) I know or suspect Middlebury College Libraries own
  • I am searching for an item by title or author
  • I am searching for an exhaustive list of materials by Subject, for example, “Abenaki,” as depicted in the screenshot with 78 results.
a MIDCAT subject listing for the search "Abenaki"

MIDCAT browse list showing results for the subject search “Abenaki”

  • I need to know an item’s call number and where it is housed in the libraries
  • I want to know the status of an item/if it has been returned
  • I want to know how many copies we have of an item
  • I want to know if we have a certain item in multiple formats, both in print and digitally
  • I want an exhaustive list of a particular type of holding, for example, all of the films in a certain language

    a screenshot from the go/midcat/ menu highlighting videos and languages with red arrows

    Advanced search menu showing one way to search MIDCAT for Middlebury’s film collection by language.

Summon ~ Except for some relatively small types of material such as the tech equipment the library makes available for loan, Summon will provide results for almost everything MIDCAT holds AND other library materials including databases, journal articles, photographs, dissertations and theses, magazines, newspapers, sound recordings and more. You can also use Summon to search libraries other than Middlebury’s.

When I use Summon…

  • I am looking for journal articles.
  • I am looking for something I’m not sure exists.
  • I am using a complex string of keywords to find a variety of materials (journal articles, photographs, audio recordings, etc.)
a screenshot from the advanced search menu in summon for selecting content type

This is a screen capture of the advanced search screen in Summon. This box holds dozens of content types and these three examples — interactive media, journal/e-journal and journal article– are a limited selection of what is available.

  • I am looking for materials held by libraries other than Middlebury.
a screenshot of a search performed in Summon indicating the "Add results beyond your library's collection" button indicated with a red arrow

After entering a search in Summon, users can select “Add results beyond your library’s collection,” indicated above with a red arrow, to review holdings outside of Middlebury’s resources.

  • I am attempting to use resources that ask me for money.  The College subscribes to many paid resources, and in order to gain access to them, I must arrive at them via a Middlebury site and sign in with my Middlebury username and password
  • “Boolean” searches are helpful, employing “AND,” “OR,” and “NOT” to limit or increase my results.

I welcome you to comment on anything I missed and to introduce new approaches. Visit the bottom of the page at go.middlebury.edu/askus to see the times at which the Research Desk is staffed, more than 40 hours a week, and visit go.middlebury.edu/librarians to find discipline-specific specialists.

A banner with black lettering and white background labeled "what is whiteness?" and six headshots of the authors

what is whiteness?: a critical examination

The Davis Family Library has highlighted a variety of groups and discourses through displays over the last 10 months including racial/ethnic minorities, the LGBTQ+ community, people with disabilities and themes of access and universal design. Take the opportunity now to critically examine whiteness as an identity and system of privilege. Visit the Davis Family Library lobby December 1st through the 17th to see works that highlight this topic. Also, listen to Dr. Laurie Essig and Dr. Daniel Silva interrogate whiteness as a social and historical construct via StoryCorps with transcript found at On Whiteness with Laurie Essig, Daniel Silva, Katrina Spencer. Use the whiteness glossary to enhance your vocabulary surrounding this topic. All underlined terms and more appear in the glossary.

Listen to the “On Whiteness” interview here.

Continue reading

A Subsaharan backdrop with an adult white Barbie posed with and surrounded by black African children

whiteness: a glossary

20+ Relevant Terms for Discussing Whiteness

As a supplementary addendum to the “what is whiteness?” blog post, display and StoryCorps interview, some Middlebury staff and faculty have put together an informal glossary of terms that helps the community to discuss whiteness. For more on these terms, use reference materials and other published works found on this crowd-sourced list and beyond.

Contributors’ Names; Hometowns; Roles on Campus; Times At Midd:

  • Katrina Spencer; Los Angeles, California; Literatures and Cultures Librarian; 10 months.
  • Daniel Silva; Newark, New Jersey; Professor of Portuguese; 4 years
  • Laurie Essig; from a lot of places, mostly NYC; Professor of Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies; 11 years
  • Amy Frazier; Memphis, Tennessee; Film & Media Librarian; 2 years.
  • Tara Affolter; Peoria, Illinois; Professor of Education Studies; 9 years

Terms:

bleaching/whitening; columbising; colorism; cultural (mis)appropriation; dominant culture/hegemony; double consciousness; Eugenics; invisibility/hypervisibility; miscegenation; passing; WASP; white anxiety; white fragility; white gaze; white guilt; white privilege; white savior complex; white supremacy; white tears; white trash; wypipo

two images of the same man with dark brown skin on the left and considerably paler skin on the right

A screenshot from Twitter user @LittleButTalawa‘s feed depicting before and after pictures of former baseball star Sammy Sosa, an athlete from the Dominican Republic. He has deep brown skin on the left and considerably paler skin on the right.

bleaching/whitening: Both of these terms describe processes in which people attempt to alter/reduce the pigmentation in their skin, typically to increase their social capital or perceived social capital. An additional element of this practice can include people avoiding exposure to the sun for fear of its potential skin darkening effect. In many cultures, bleaching and whitening reflect a prioritization and preference for a beauty paradigm that values pale/light skin. To see more on this industry and samples of products used for this practice, visit Dencia’s Whitenicious page. (Katrina) Continue reading

New Workshop — Tech Services Overview for New or Recent Hires

Hello My Name Is <Place name here>Information Technology Services (ITS) is offering a new workshop with recent hires in mind called “ITS & You:  Technology Services Overview.”  We’ll introduce services and resources provided by ITS to all Middlebury College employees, including: email, file storage, account security, online learning, and how to obtain computing help.  The workshop format will be a presentation with questions entertained along the way, followed by an optional half hour for hands-on assistance with specific questions.

Visit http://go/techworkshops/ to view the schedule and sign up using our online form.  Although geared toward new or recent hires, everyone is welcome to attend – you might surprise yourself with an “aha” moment or two.

24/7 exam hours at the Davis Family Library

The Davis Family Library will be open 24 hours a day starting Sunday morning, December 3rd. Regular hours resume for Friday and Saturday, December 8th and 9th, then 24/7 resumes until 11 pm on Friday, December 15th. After 11 pm, you will need your ID to access the building. After 1 am, there will be no circulation services provided – the library will only function as a quiet study space.

Armstrong Library will have regular hours.

A full calendar of the hours can be found at go/hours