Category Archives: LIS Staff Interest

Friday Links – June 20, 2014

Kevin Smith, Scholarly Communications Officer at Duke University and author of the Scholarly Communications blog, is a co-host of a 4-week MOOC – Copyright for Educators and Librarians. Also participating will be Lisa Macklin, Director of the Scholarly Communications Office at the library of Emory University, and Anne Gilliland, Scholarly Communications Officer at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Friday Links – June 13, 2014

HathiTrust Digital Library Wins Latest Round in Battle With Authors – Chronicle of Higher Education

Something one just needs to read.  Nice images, too!

The first half is this incredibly dark rant about how the Internet is alienating and inhuman, how it’s turning us all into lonely monsters.”

“But in the second half, I’ll turn it around and present my vision of an alternative future. I’ll get the audience fired up like a proper American motivational speaker. After the big finish, we’ll burst out of the conference hall into the streets of Düsseldorf, hoist the black flag, and change the world.”

As I was preparing this talk, however, I found it getting longer and longer. In the interests of time, I’m afraid I’m only going to be able to present the first half…

 

Summon 2.0 is now Live at Middlebury Libraries

Summon, our library resource discovery layer, now has a new and improved interface.

In the 6/3/2014 update, the vendor (ProQuest / Serials Solutions) made several bug fixes that we had been eagerly awaiting. Even more importantly, the changes offer better layout, better integration with our library research guides (LibGuides), and context-sensitive librarian information on the results pages, among other things.

You can access Summon from the same places you always could.

  • from the “Library Quick Search” on the library main page: go/lib
  • from the Summon page: go/summon
  • or anywhere you find a Summon search widget on a library page

Systems and Network maintenance this Sunday morning

During our maintenance window this Sunday morning between 6 and 10 am we have the following actives planned:

We will be upgrading the Middlebury and Bread Loaf campus wireless network.  This will result in each wireless access point on both of these campuses rebooting, as a result we expect a less than 10 minute interruption of wireless services throughout both campuses, likely between 6:30 and 8:00 am.

We will upgrading the our VPN (virtual private network) appliance that provides service to the JunOs Pulse VPN client.  Between 6:30 and 8:00 am there will be a less than 30 minute service interruption of off-campus VPN access to Middlebury’s network.

We will be upgrading our MiddCloud file serving environment that includes MiddFiles and other network file shares generally used by the Science departments.  Between 7:00 and 8:00 am we expect a less than 10 minute service interruption of MiddCloud.

We appreciate your patience as we strive to keep our systems and network operating optimally.

“At the beginning of the term” – a poem

Another poem from Gary Margolis, this one about higher education:

At the beginning of the term
     for students and teachers lying down

I used to hand out the syllabus,
its outline of books and assignments,
its expected exams.

Answered the first questions.
How long should a short paper be?
Do we have to use quotes for everything?

Does speaking in class count
toward our final grade?
I went around the room

pronouncing their names,
asking each one to say
a few words of what drew them

to this course, what they hoped
to learn and wanted to take home
at the end of the day. A phrase I said

they couldn’t write, by the way.
We’ve all heard it so often it makes
a cliché of the news, when a summary is

trying to be made. I think of today,
watching again students being interviewed,
saying they heard shots in the next room.

They locked themselves in. Later,
in shock, one said he didn’t know how
he would get his work done, hand in

his due paper. Until he realized
what he was saying for the wounded
and dead. What, I’m afraid,

my college has instructed me to note
first, at the beginning of the term
and now every day. The locks

on the windows and doors.
How a book can be used
to shield our hearts.

June 16th downtime – Videoconferencing bridge & software

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the installation of a new firewall, the videoconferencing bridge and polycom software will be unavailable on June 16th, from 9:00am EST – 5:00pm EST. If you need access to videoconferencing software or bridging capability on June 16th from 9am to 5pm please contact me and I can provide you with an alternative.

In addition, any calls between videoconferencing rooms will need to be done using the backup addresses in the address book of each system. Please contact me if you have a video conference planned on June 16th.

We will follow up immediately after completing testing, and no later than 5:00pm on June 16th, to notify you that the software and the bridge are available.

The firewall is essential to better protect our videoconferencing equipment that is being used more extensively than ever before. We chose this date by looking at the schedule of videoconferences and the overall schedule of summer programs.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Petar

Friday links – June 6, 2014

HighWire Press moves away from the Stanford University Library and becomes HighWire Press, Inc. (HighWire Press sells their online journal platform as a product to journal publishers, including many academic societies in STEM fields, as well as major publishers such as Oxford University Press. Here is a list of their clients.)

While this is by no means the first technology transfer out of a university to an independent company, …, the transition of HighWire Press from an initiative of the library to a new corporate identity is one worth taking note of in our community.

If nothing else, it will be interesting to see how this move to for-profit corporate status will impact journal pricing in the near and long-term future.

Using Video Annotation Tools to Teach Film AnalysisSocialBook, a project from The Institute for the Future of the Book, has primarily been used as a tool for allowing groups to comment on books, whether on the book in general or at the level of individual paragraphs. The new video annotation tool works similarly, allowing users to comment either on the film in general or on individual shots. Students can enroll for SocialBook using their Twitter or Facebook login information or by creating a new account.

Leap Motion’s Gesture Control Finds Niche Uses In Medicine, Art and Augmented Reality – Though Leap’s early inspiration was to make 3D modeling more intuitive, comparisons to gesture-controlled sci-fi holographic displays led some to surmise the Leap controller could be an heir apparent to the touch screen and mouse.

Summer workshop at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction:
APPLIED CARTOONING: AN EDUCATOR’S SYMPOSIUM
“…Through lectures, workshops, and panel discussions this symposium will explore the many ways that educators and librarians can use cartooning to enrich any school or organization’s programming and curriculum.”