Category Archives: libspotlight

“NExit” …Or, RIP NExpress

NExit
Beginning May 1st, all library resources
not available locally may be requested
via Interlibrary Loan using ILLiad at:
go.middlebury.edu/ill

Or, use the ILL links in Worldcat:
ILL button

  • Requesting through NExpress will be unavailable after April 30th 2017.
  • Items borrowed from NExpress libraries are due May 16th. These items cannot be renewed past that date and must be returned. If you have an item that you still need to use, you may place a request via ILLiad.
  • The Library continues to work with our former NExpress partners via ILL. If a requested item is owned by a former NExpress library, we will do our best to expedite the request.

You will continue to see quick delivery from the NExpress libraries.

Read more about why NExpress has (sadly) come to an end in Keywords, the library newsletter:
RIP NExpress

“State of Marriage” Film Screening

On Wed., April 19th at 4:30pm in Dana Auditorium,  Middlebury College Special Collections & Archives will host the first Addison County screening of the documentary film “The State of Marriage.”  The film draws on archival footage and more recent interviews to tell the gripping story of the remarkable men and women who pioneered the national marriage equality movement through their groundbreaking efforts in Vermont.  The work of Susan Murray and Beth Robinson, then attorneys in Middlebury, is featured as they work through the legal system and create a grassroots movement, all the while facing stiff opposition to the idea of gays and lesbians marrying legally.

There will be a question and answer segment following the film with the filmmakers Jeff Kaufman and Marcia Ross of Floating World Pictures, and key participants in the Vermont Supreme Court case, Baker v. State, including attorney Susan Murray and plaintiffs Lois Farnham and Holly Putterbaugh. The event is cosponsored by Chellis House – Women’s Resource Center, the Film & Media Culture and Political Science Departments, and Middlebury College Queers & Allies. In 2015, Middlebury’s Special Collections & Archives became the official repository for the Vermont Freedom to Marry Task Force’s archives. This nonprofit task force, formed in 1996, was instrumental in passing both Vermont’s landmark civil unions law in 2000 and subsequent same-sex marriage law, which took effect in 2009.

The Huffington Post wrote that “The State of Marriage” is, “Gripping. Audiences will cheer” and the Hollywood Reporter described it as, “Indispensable. A suspenseful nail-biter right up to the feel good ending.” Free and open to the public.  Popcorn will be served!

Plaintiffs in the Baker v. State case celebrate the passage of the Civil Union Law in 2000 (Photo courtesy of Floating World Pictures)

Group Study Spaces for Group Projects – Reserve Yours!

Group Study Rooms - Reserve OnlineNow available at the Davis Family Library and the Armstrong Library!   Make your own reservations for group studies. It’s easy to see existing reservations and pick your time online.

View policies and make reservations at:

Make the most of the space! Group studies are for a minimum of 2 people, unless you’re practicing for an oral presentation. If your group has reserved a room and you arrive to find the room is in use, your reservation permits you to ask the other group to move to another space.

New Library Water Fountain Helps the Environment and Those with Disabilities

Facilities installed a new ADA-compliant water fountain in the Davis Family Library that is designed to fill water bottles too.  The Library Space Team successfully applied for an Environmental Council grant to cover the cost for one.  The fountain will calculate the number of disposable plastic bottles that are saved by using it.  Next time you are thinking of buying bottled water, think instead about using a refillable container (and thus avoid landfill waste or the energy and financial costs of recycling).  It will also be the only ADA-compliant fountain in the Library, so if someone in a wheelchair needs a water fountain, be sure to direct them to this one, which is just opposite the print copy room on the main level.

 

Readings on Conflict, Conversation, and Resolution

book displayMany thanks to the Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life for recommending a thoughtful selection of books to help all members of the campus community renew and restore relationships with one another.

Find these books on conflict, conversation and resolution in the atrium of the Davis Family Library. Most of them can be checked out in print or found online in MIDCAT. If you don’t have time right now, that’s okay! Along with the books on display, you’ll find printed copies of the reading list. Take one with you for later.

Readings on Conflict, Conversation, and Resolution

  • Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most. Stone, Patton & Heen, 1999
  • The Little Book of Dialogue for Difficult Subjects: A Practical, Hands-On Guide. Schirch & Campt, 2007
  • Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High. Patterson, Grenny, McMillan & Switzler, 2012
  • The Little Book of Conflict Transformation. Lederach, 2003
  • The Little Book of Strategic Peacebuilding: A Vision and Framework for Peace with Justice. Schirch, 2004
  • The Little Book of Circle Processes: A New/Old Approach to Peacemaking. Pranis, 2005
  • How to Disagree Without Being Disagreeable. Elgin, 1997

March Library Newsletter

Don’t miss the March issue of Keywords: The Middlebury College Library Newsletter!

Keywords: The Middlebury College Library Newsletter

Read about how the library is planning for College-wide budget reductions, how you can dig through Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA) materials online, our battle to acquire a 1521 edition of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, new colleagues at the library, and more.

Looking for better sources? Use Library Research Guides!

Use Library Research GuidesThere’s a guide for every class you’re taking, from American Studies, to Chemistry, to French, or Theatre, and more. Browse a complete list of subjects here.

Every research guide is carefully curated  by a Middlebury librarian. You’ll find links to major databases, search tips, and answers to questions that are commonly asked by students in classes like yours.

Most importantly,  you’ll find contact information for the librarian who can help you transition from a research assignment to a research question, and from a research question to a solid research project of any size or scope. Use the “Schedule Appointment” button, or send an email, to sign up for a one-on-one research consultation. If we can talk with you about what you’re working on, we can ensure you’re getting exactly what you need.

Find your new favorite Middlebury Libraries Research Guide at http://go.middlebury.edu/guides.