Category Archives: libspotlight

VT Historic Sites Pass now available at the Circulation Desk

Now available for checkout from the Davis Family Library Circulation desk: a family pass (up to 8 people in one vehicle) for free entry into a Vermont Historic Site. This means you can go see and of these historic sites – the Bennington Battle Monument, President Calvin Coolidge, Chimney Point, Hubbardton Battlefield, Senator Justin S. Morrill, Mount Independence, Old Constitution House, President Chester A. Arthur, and Eureka Schoolhouse and Baltimore Covered Bridge – for the bottom line price of zero dollars! At that price, you can’t afford to NOT go learn some history!

New in the Library: Mobile Standing Desks!

The Davis Family Library now has 3 mobile standing desks.

“The Nomad Stand”

Students can use these anywhere in the library.  If one is not in use, just take it to a spot that is the right height for your comfort level.

They were designed by Franklin Dean-Farrar in Athletics and made here in Middlebury by Maple Landmark Woodcraft.

If these are popular we’ll order more.

Students have asked for standing desks, and we listened!

— The Library Space Team

How to use library databases from off campus

This summer, take the library with youGoing away this summer? Take the library with you! Yes, you can search library databases from off campus. Just start at the library site: go.middlebury.edu/lib.  From there, JSTOR, ebooks, audiobooks, Summon and all of our online journals, magazines and newspapers are available to you…no matter where you are!

When you’re off campus, links that are on library web pages (a few examples of library web pages include Research Guides, Summon and the Journals list) will ask you to log in with Midd credentials. It’s as easy as that!

Seniors: Here’s how to get alumni access to library databases!

Enjoy the summer!

Beast, Animal, Brute

Inspired by the 18th century French philosopher Denis Diderot’s massive, thirty-five volume Encyclopédie, the current exhibition in Special Collections & Archives reveals our enduring curiosity of animals through a selection of rare and unusual books dating from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

The Lamia, a mythical demon from ancient Greece who devoured children, from Edward Topsell’s The historie of foure-footed beastes, 1607

 

Other works on display include Edward Topsell’s The historie of foure-footed beastes, published in 1607 in London (and possibly one of  William Shakespeare’s literary sourcebooks) and a polar bear as described by Captain James Cook, the British explorer, in the 18th century, upon arrival in the Russian Arctic Circle.

Zoology of New York, or the New-York fauna : comprising detailed descriptions of all the animals hitherto observed within the state of New York, with brief notices of those occasionally found near its borders, and accompanied by appropriate illustrations, by James De Kay, 1842-44

Also on exhibit in the Davis Family Library: Banned and Banished: Ovid and 2,000 Years of Exile curated by Mikaela Taylor.

Beast, Animal, Brute

Inspired by the 18th century French philosopher Denis Diderot’s massive, thirty-five volume Encyclopédie, the current exhibition in Special Collections & Archives reveals our enduring curiosity of animals through a selection of rare and unusual books dating from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

The Lamia, a mythical demon from ancient Greece who devoured children, from Edward Topsell’s The historie of foure-footed beastes, 1607

 

Other works on display include Edward Topsell’s The historie of foure-footed beastes, published in 1607 in London (and possibly one of  William Shakespeare’s literary sourcebooks) and a polar bear as described by Captain James Cook, the British explorer, in the 18th century, upon arrival in the Russian Arctic Circle.

Zoology of New York, or the New-York fauna : comprising detailed descriptions of all the animals hitherto observed within the state of New York, with brief notices of those occasionally found near its borders, and accompanied by appropriate illustrations, by James De Kay, 1842-44

Also on exhibit in the Davis Family Library: Banned and Banished: Ovid and 2,000 Years of Exile curated by Mikaela Taylor.

24/7 period for Davis Family Library

The Davis Family Library will be open 24 hours a day starting Sunday morning, May 7th. Regular hours resume for Friday and Saturday, May 12th and 13th, then 24/7 resumes until 8 pm on Tuesday, May 23rd. After 11 pm, you will need your ID to access the building.

Armstrong Library will have regular hours, with extended hours Friday and Saturday, May 19th and 20th (closing at 10 pm).

A full calendar of the hours can be found at go/hours

What’s up with “My Books Smell Good”

Last summer, Special Collections & Archives rolled out new swag: black tote bags (er, book bags) and stickers emblazoned with the slogan My books smell good. First, we want to thank Carey Bass, Middlebury’s talented graphic designer, for the bold serif font and brash ending punctuation. But, “What does it mean?” (People have asked, with a skeptical gaze.) As well as: “Isn’t it a little vulgar?” A little behind-the-scenes seemed overdue.

In a 2010 interview in The Paris Review, the science fiction writer Ray Bradbury  was asked about e-books and Kindles:

Those aren’t books. You can’t hold a computer in your hand like you can a book. A computer does not smell. There are two perfumes to a book. If a book is new, it smells great. If a book is old, it smells even better. It smells like ancient Egypt. A book has got to smell. You have to hold it in your hands and pray to it. You put it in your pocket and you walk with it. And it stays with you forever. But the computer doesn’t do that for you. I’m sorry.

That sums it up, though a little curmudgeonly.  And from the Journal of Chromatography, chemists used solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to analyze volatile organic compounds emitted from a naturally aged groundwood pulp paper originating from an old book. (Read it for yourself here.) Volatile organic compounds. This is what we’re talkin’ about:

And another recent article lays out a framework to identify, protect and conserve the smells that influence the way we engage with the past. Smithsonian Magazine wrote about this research, and here’s a photograph of a scientist taking a deep sniff at the National Archives of The Netherlands.

From Smithsonian Magazine, April 7, 2017

 

Whatever it is that brings you to our doorpoetry, history, chemistry, or a hankering to smell a centuries old book for yourselfjust come. We have lots of bags left and they make memorable graduation gifts. (Totes are $5, while they last).

Email specialcollections@middlebury.edu
Find us on Instagram and Facebook

 

“NExit” …Or, RIP NExpress

NExit
Beginning May 1st, all library resources
not available locally may be requested
via Interlibrary Loan using ILLiad at:
go.middlebury.edu/ill

Or, use the ILL links in Worldcat:
ILL button

  • Requesting through NExpress will be unavailable after April 30th 2017.
  • Items borrowed from NExpress libraries are due May 16th. These items cannot be renewed past that date and must be returned. If you have an item that you still need to use, you may place a request via ILLiad.
  • The Library continues to work with our former NExpress partners via ILL. If a requested item is owned by a former NExpress library, we will do our best to expedite the request.

You will continue to see quick delivery from the NExpress libraries.

Read more about why NExpress has (sadly) come to an end in Keywords, the library newsletter:
RIP NExpress