Category Archives: libspotlight

A phonograph record on a post card? A professor throws a curveball at Special Collections.

Recently Paul Sommers, Paige-Wright Professor of Economics, stopped by the archives with an unusual item: he had purchased a “melody card” online, a paper phonograph record first manufactured in the 1930s, most notably on cereal boxes or as inserts in magazines.

Baseball Hall of Fame "record" post card.

Baseball Hall of Fame “record” post card.

His postcard reads: Play this record on the PHONOGRAPH, 78rpm speed manual. Prof. Sommers doesn’t have a record player that plays 78s, so he got in touch with the Giamatti Research Center of the Baseball Hall of Fame to see what was recorded on the card. That’s when the story gets interesting. They couldn’t tell him because they don’t hold a copy of the card in their vast collection of baseball memorabilia.

So, Prof. Sommers turned to Special Collections. Armed with a 78 rpm turntable and some audio software, we were able to play his postcard (click on the audio strip below to hear for yourself) :

Every now and then somebody throws us a curveball and we’re thrilled when we hit it out of the park. (Aren’t you glad we resisted the temptation to pepper this post with baseball lingo until the very end?) Play ball!

Baseball Hal of Fame "record" post card

Baseball Hall of Fame “record” post card

Hey Students! Try Our WT Workshop on Research & Zotero

Are you working on a senior thesis or starting a big research project? Drowning in journal articles and books, but not sure how to keep track of them all? Let us help you with the next stage of your journey as a power researcher in our Winter Term workshop “Zotero and Beyond: Power Research Tips for Student Researchers.” You’ll see how the research process is itself a way of synthesizing your findings and mapping out next steps. By the time you leave, you’ll be an expert in Zotero, the citation management tool that can help you save, organize, and cite your sources, and you’ll encounter a variety of note-taking strategies and see the ways that developing personalized research routines can jump-start you into the writing process.

Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 from 4:15pm-6:45pm
Non-credit workshop, $5
Pizza provided!
Register at go/wtw/

Thanksgiving hours at the Libraries

Davis Family Library
Monday 11/24: 7:30 am – 1 am
Tuesday 11/25: 7:30 am – 8 pm
Wednesday 11/26: 9 am – 5 pm
Thursday-Saturday 11/27-29: CLOSED
Sunday 11/30: 24/7 exam period begins at 9 am. Card access only outside of regular library hours.

Armstrong Library
Monday 11/24: 7:45 am – midnight
Tuesday 11/25: 7:45 am – 5 pm
Wednesday 11/26: 9 am – 5 pm
Thursday-Saturday 11/27-29: CLOSED
Sunday 11/30: 4 pm – midnight

We were greatly shocked with the news…

During a recent visit to the archives by Professor Ellie Gebarowski-Shafer’s Religion 130 class, The Christian Tradition, students plowed through 214 years of Middlebury College missionary history with College Archivist Danielle Rougeau. Amid the pages of 19th century cursive was this diary entry by Mary Martin, wife of a missionary to China and grandmother of Mabel Martin (later Mary Buttolph), Class of 1911. (Mary Martin is pictured below, circa 1865.)

Mary Martin


After the death of her husband and a young son in China, Mary returned to Vermont by way of San Francisco. After 69 days at sea, she writes her last diary entry on May 21, 1965:

We were greatly shocked with the news we heard on our arrival this morning of the assassination of president Lincoln but very glad to learn that the war is over and that slavery is abolished.

Postscript: Lincoln was assassinated on April 15, 1865. News traveled slowly in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Her mention of this news falls smack in the middle of the page below. To learn more about Middlebury missionaries, Mary Martin, or to cut your teeth on some 19th century cursive, visit Special Collections.

Martin.1965

Library Hours for Fall break

The Libraries will have reduced hours this weekend for Fall break.

Davis will close at 8 pm on Friday and be open 9-5 Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. On Tuesday, we will open at 9 am and close at the regular 1 am.

Armstrong will close at 5 pm on Friday and be closed Saturday and Sunday. Hours Monday will be 9-5 and Tuesday will be 9-midnight.

Regular hours resume on Wednesday.

See go/hours for the full calendar.

Students learn the craft of medieval papermaking

Well, to be specific, medieval paper was actually parchment, made from animal hides, rather than trees and literally all of our knowledge of the Middle Ages was preserved on skins made from calves, sheep, or goats. To better understand the chemistry, art, and labor of parchment, Middlebury College’s Special Collections & Archives, together with Professor Eliza Garrison’s Medieval Manuscripts seminar, hosted Jesse Meyer from Pergamena. Watch us scud a goatskin (remove stubborn hair from the skin) and wield a lunarium (a crescent-shaped blade) to remove the fat and flesh. Follow this link to read a longer article about our adventure in medieval life.

 

Don’t forget to write your mother, circa 1932

Our own Professor of Psychology at Middlebury College Barbara Hofer writes about the modern day iConnected Parent, constantly in contact with their College-bound kids through cell phones and Skype…well, the archives recently exposed something of a connected parent, but from over 80 years ago.

Here’s a letter from October 18, 1932. The mother of Charles Edward Stevenson, Jr., Class of 1936, writes to the Director of Admissions (scroll down for the full transcription):


Stevenson 1936

Stevenson 1936b

Dear Sir

I am writing you to find out if Charlie Stevenson is alright and if he is I want to know why he does not write his mother it will be to [sic] weeks Friday since I had any word from him I sent him his laundry and a little pocket money post office money order I am trailing that now to see if he cashed it. I know that boys are dilatory about writing sometimes but I never knew Charley Stevenson to do that before that is why I am worried about him if I do not get a letter from you I am going up there to find out what is going on.

Please answer write away

Very truly yours

Mrs C.E. Stevenson

 

One day later, Mrs. Stevenson received a typescript reply (again, transcribed below to help with the faded ink):

ResponseStevenson

Dear Mrs. Stevenson,

Your letter of October 18th is at hand and I have seen your son this morning and sent you the following telegram: “Your son is well and says has written you today”. I trust that you received the wire promptly so that you have not had to worry longer as to your son’s welfare. He seemed to be in perfect health when I saw him this morning but said that he had been very busy for the last few days. As you know, the fraternity rushing has been going on for the last two weeks and the boys have little spare time, as a rule, during that period. I presume that your son had not realized how long a time has elapsed since he wrote you, but you will doubtless receive his letter right away, if it  has not already reached you.

Very truly yours,

E.J. Wiley