Category Archives: libitsblog

Library Hours for Fall break

The Libraries will have reduced hours this weekend for Fall break.

Davis will close at 8 pm on Friday and be open 9-5 Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. On Tuesday, we will open at 9 am and close at the regular 1 am.

Armstrong will close at 5 pm on Friday and be closed Saturday and Sunday. Hours Monday will be 9-5 and Tuesday will be 9-midnight.

Regular hours resume on Wednesday.

See go/hours for the full calendar.

Students learn the craft of medieval papermaking

Well, to be specific, medieval paper was actually parchment, made from animal hides, rather than trees and literally all of our knowledge of the Middle Ages was preserved on skins made from calves, sheep, or goats. To better understand the chemistry, art, and labor of parchment, Middlebury College’s Special Collections & Archives, together with Professor Eliza Garrison’s Medieval Manuscripts seminar, hosted Jesse Meyer from Pergamena. Watch us scud a goatskin (remove stubborn hair from the skin) and wield a lunarium (a crescent-shaped blade) to remove the fat and flesh. Follow this link to read a longer article about our adventure in medieval life.

 

Are you suffering from SSDS (Sidebar, Subpage, Drupal Syndrome)?

NervousIs your department head asking you to update the department’s web page?  Does the thought of adding a sidebar make you call the Helpdesk?  Fear not, join us for a Drupal Intro class.  We’ll cover the basics of Drupal so you’ll be adding links, pictures, and a host of other cool things to your page the very next day.

For you more advanced users who may be struggling with needs beyond the basics (such as converting your forms), join us for a work session or two.  We’ll help you get the job done and you’ll leave with the “know how.”

You’ll find all the upcoming workshop information at go/techworkshops; sign up for the class that fits your needs.  See you on the sidebar… or maybe in a subpage.

Don’t forget to write your mother, circa 1932

Our own Professor of Psychology at Middlebury College Barbara Hofer writes about the modern day iConnected Parent, constantly in contact with their College-bound kids through cell phones and Skype…well, the archives recently exposed something of a connected parent, but from over 80 years ago.

Here’s a letter from October 18, 1932. The mother of Charles Edward Stevenson, Jr., Class of 1936, writes to the Director of Admissions (scroll down for the full transcription):


Stevenson 1936

Stevenson 1936b

Dear Sir

I am writing you to find out if Charlie Stevenson is alright and if he is I want to know why he does not write his mother it will be to [sic] weeks Friday since I had any word from him I sent him his laundry and a little pocket money post office money order I am trailing that now to see if he cashed it. I know that boys are dilatory about writing sometimes but I never knew Charley Stevenson to do that before that is why I am worried about him if I do not get a letter from you I am going up there to find out what is going on.

Please answer write away

Very truly yours

Mrs C.E. Stevenson

 

One day later, Mrs. Stevenson received a typescript reply (again, transcribed below to help with the faded ink):

ResponseStevenson

Dear Mrs. Stevenson,

Your letter of October 18th is at hand and I have seen your son this morning and sent you the following telegram: “Your son is well and says has written you today”. I trust that you received the wire promptly so that you have not had to worry longer as to your son’s welfare. He seemed to be in perfect health when I saw him this morning but said that he had been very busy for the last few days. As you know, the fraternity rushing has been going on for the last two weeks and the boys have little spare time, as a rule, during that period. I presume that your son had not realized how long a time has elapsed since he wrote you, but you will doubtless receive his letter right away, if it  has not already reached you.

Very truly yours,

E.J. Wiley

lynda.com Site Unavailable Sept 19 from 2:00-3:00 AM (EST)

lynda_logo 72x72For the night owls out there, please note that our lynda.com online learning resource will be unavailable from 2:00 – 3:00 AM Friday, September 19, while web server capacity improvements are implemented.    (What’s that you say?   You haven’t heard of lynda??  Visit go/lyndainfo to see what you’re missing.)

 

For Staff & Faculty: One Stop Shopping for Department & Course Website Assistance

Help Key

Need to make changes to your departmental web page?  Could you use a hand with your course website or blog?  Have questions about moving your webforms to our new secure server?  Do wiki formatting woes keep you awake at night?  We have the solution — a peaceful place where you can work on your pages AND get your questions answered.  Sign up for a Website Maintenance Work Session (or two).  Staff from Information Technology Services (ITS) and Academic Technology will be available to answer your questions and help you troubleshoot problems. These are not formal workshops — please bring your work, your questions, and yourself!

Our first session will be offered Tuesday, September 16 at 9:00 am in Davis Family Library, room 105.  Visit go/techworkshops to view the rest of the fall semester schedule.  Please use our convenient online signup form to let us know you what session(s) you plan to attend.

A recipe to keep mites off your cheese, circa 1778

In the same year that Captain Cook sailed to Hawaii and Great Britain declared war on France, Helen Weldon started her recipe book in Bath, England on January 29, 1778. In addition to keeping mites off your cheese, she includes recipes for Mock Turtle (Calves head) soup, Onion Soop [sic] and raspberry vinegar “for those who want a pleasant cooler” in the summer. Remedies like Teeth Water, Poison for Rats & Mice, and Diuretic Balls for Horses are included too. Her handwritten notebook was acquired by Special Collections this summer. Learn more in our online catalog or by visiting Special Collections.

WeldonCover

Receipts Cookery, 1778

 

WeldonPage

Baked Calfs head