Author Archives: Heather Stafford

Friday Links – April 4, 2014

The Terran Computational Calendar - Synchronized with the northern winter solstice and the UNIX Epoch, the terran computational calendar contains 13 identical months of 28 days each in addition to a short Month Zero containing only new year’s day and a single leap year day every four years (with the exception of every 128 years).

Why Facebook Acquiring Oculus Rift Is A Good Thing – Here are a lot of numbers with the word ‘billion’ in them. Facebook has 1.2 billion active users. In 2013 Facebook made $7.872 billion in revenue. Facebook could afford to pay $2 billion to acquire a technology that could have potentially been doomed to a niche market, squandering all its incredible potential, squandering a genuine chance to change the world through interactivity. This is now a potential that has an exponentially stronger chance of become a hard reality.

Infographic: See the daily routines of the world’s most famous creative people – Ever wonder how your routine stacks up against others? Check out this infographic from Info We Trust to compare your schedule to Darwin’s.

 

Friday Links – March 28, 2014

The faces of libraries change, but we still love them:
From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers–and beyond from Pew Research Internet Project

How MOOC Video Production Affects Student Engagement is a good read for anyone considering the use of video in an instructional context. For a more in depth analysis see Philip Guo’s published paper How Video Production Affects Student Engagement: An Empirical Study of MOOC Videos.

Manuscripts of Lichfield Cathedral - 3D renderings of sixteen pages of the 8th-century St Chad Gospels: https://lichfield.as.uky.edu/models/gallery

3D printing: 10 companies using it in ground-breaking ways – A growing number of innovative companies are experimenting with 3D printers, propelling the technology closer to the mainstream market.

Friday Links – March 14, 2014

9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners - The article provides is geared towards fully online courses, but it is also good advice for faculty wanting to created engagement in a hybrid course.

Memes, Genes and Evolution on Facebook - The way memes evolve on Facebook is startlingly similar to the way genes evolve on Earth, say researchers who have carried out the first large-scale study of memetic evolution.

Photos: 3D printers, a tour of the top models – The MakerBot Replicator Mini is the cheapest of the versions at $1,375. It’s designed for home use and only weighs 18 pounds. Download the designs on the tablet app, connect the Mini to a USB cable, and print. The machine is optimized for PLA filament.

Two Middlebury Grads Offer Software to Help You See in 3D – Shane Scranton and Nate Beatty are developing software for the Oculus Rift to connect architecture, design and 3D modeling into an immersive experience.

Seduction in the Poster Session – Plan, learn and whatever you do – don’t use Comic Sans! This article provides poster making tips from Kathryn Everson, a PhD Student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks & University of Alaska Museum. Adobe InDesign and Illustrator are highlighted as two of the best tools to use for poster production and (GOOD NEWS!) these are both available at Middlebury in the Wilson Media Lab!

Five tips for creating a successful presentation with an iPad - connection and swapping between applications are just two of the considerations in this short list of recommendations.

Friday Links – February 14, 2014

The return-on-investment of reading from Forbes, or Why you should read books

Vermonter Bryan Alexander of NITLE “goes” to Educause via Doppelbot.

Cute and humorous video about data sharing, management, and preservation from the NYU Health Sciences Libraries –

He Said She Said – How Blogs are Changing the Scientific Discourse – Mainstream media always follows the same kind of ‘He said, she said’ template, which is why even climate change deniers get their say, although they are a tiny minority. The leading scientific journals, on the other hand, are expensive and behind pay-walls. But it turns out there are places on the web where you can follow science up close and personal: The many personal blogs written by scientists — and the conversation there is changing the very nature of scientific debate.

Cloudinary vs. Blitline: Cloud-Image Services Compared – As Web applications grow in number and capability, storing large amounts of images can quickly become a problem.

Did you ever wish you were an Olympian? Check out these interactive elements from the New York Times to get close to the action from miles away. (Thanks to our digital media tutors for this find!!)

Friday Links – January 24, 2014

With a tagline like this: ”A spectacular historical atlas refashioned for the 21st century” who can resist? Check out the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States presented by the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond to view a digital version of Charles O. Paullin and John K. Wright’s atlas that was originally published in 1932.

 

Exciting! Students and staff at University College London serendipitously discovered a type 1a supernova in M82 on January 22. Read about it here!

Supernova in M82, before and after, by  E. Guido, N. Howes, M. Nicolini
Supernova in M82, before and after, by E. Guido, N. Howes, M. Nicolini, January 2014.

If you are very keen, check out the IAU Transient Object Followup Reports.

Research Desk Poetry (and more at the LIS Facebook page):

poem

Is your refrigerator running? Then it might be spamming people.

Google is pulling the plug on guest blogging for increased ranking.

If you put an email address in a Google Calendar event’s title, that person will get a reminder of the event, even if you don’t share it with them. This is “expected behavior” according to Google.

Friday Links – January 10, 2014

Hmmmm…it’s pretty snazzy looking but how do I know if I should I trust that infographic? Fast Company has some good tips here.  (Spoiler alert: the article title is “Infographics Lie. Here’s How to Spot the B.S.”)

Interested in a story for everyone? Check out the Big History Project and “explore 13.7 billion years of shared history…”

Speaking of stories – the New York Times has compiled “2013: The Year in Interactive Storytelling” Be sure to scroll down to view the Explanatory Graphics section. You can learn about the Higgs Boson or untangle the fast choreography of a successful field goal on the football field.

How do the Digital Humanities translate to the classroom? The Chronicle spotlights UCLA and Emory in “How the Humanities Compute in the Classroom”.

How many times do people switch devices in an hour? Quite a few, according to a UK study.

Friday Links – Nov. 15, 2013

For those of you with kids, this article “Teach Kids how to Code, Make Apps and 3-D Models With These Tools” lists some interesting possibilities. From School Library Journal and The Digital Shift.

Announcement: “Digital Public Library of America Launches DPLA Bookshelf

DPLA Bookshelf lets the user scroll a visual representation of a bookshelf… When a user of the DPLA site searches for books, the results are displayed as books on a bookshelf; the shelf is shown as a vertical stack so that the titles and authors are more easily readable on their spines. The width of the book represents the actual height of the physical book, and its thickness represents its page count. The spine is colored with one of ten depths of blue to “heatmap” how relevant the work is to the reader’s search.” Follow the announcement link to learn more.

3D Printing is a hot topic, but have you heard of 3D scanning? Lucky for us – the Smithsonian has, and has been busy scanning several artifacts that you can now view online! Their 3D exploration tool is in Beta so they are looking for feedback and bug reports. Load time is a little slow – but it’s worth it! (Check out the Woolly Mammoth!)

Smithsonian X 3D of a Wooly Mammoth, http://3d.si.edu/explorer?modelid=55

Screen shot of Smithsonian X 3D of a Woolly Mammoth

Curious about how 3D scanning works? Check out the video below.

 

 

Are you interested in learning more about infographics?

Lynda.com offers a collection of resources about creating infographics that can be found at this link: http://www.lynda.com/Infographics-training-tutorials/1462-0.html (after you log in using your Middlebury credentials). Not sure what an infographic is? Check out this example on the history of audio equipment via fastcodesign.com where the creators offer a mini-window into the work it took to pull it all together.

The Wilson Media Lab in the Library offers many multimedia tools that can be used to build infographics. Digital Media Tutors are available Sunday – Thursday from 1 pm – 1 am and on Fridays from 1 pm – 7 pm to assist users interested in using these tools.