Author Archives: Carrie Macfarlane

About Carrie Macfarlane

Head of Research and Instruction.

Friday Links – July 11, 2014

At Sea in a Deluge of Data
By Alison J. Head and John Wihbey
Chronicle of Higher Education
People in charge of hiring at large organizations such as Microsoft, Nationwide Insurance and the FBI say that recent college graduates lack skills in research and analysis. “The new workers default to quick answers plucked from the Internet. That method might be fine for looking up a definition or updating a fact, but for many tasks, it proved superficial and incomplete…”

How unexpected opportunities can inform practice – As a part of some of my coursework I have had the opportunity to read some interesting educational research. I thought it might be helpful to share a brief overview of some of the articles that I’ve reviewed. This is the first post in a series that I was planning to share. Please feel free to contact me at hstafford@middlebury.edu if you’d like to discuss further.

11 University and Library Groups Release Net-Neutrality Principles – The nation’s colleges and libraries have a message for the Federal Communications Commission: Don’t mess with net neutrality.

“At the beginning of the term” – a poem

Another poem from Gary Margolis, this one about higher education:

At the beginning of the term
     for students and teachers lying down

I used to hand out the syllabus,
its outline of books and assignments,
its expected exams.

Answered the first questions.
How long should a short paper be?
Do we have to use quotes for everything?

Does speaking in class count
toward our final grade?
I went around the room

pronouncing their names,
asking each one to say
a few words of what drew them

to this course, what they hoped
to learn and wanted to take home
at the end of the day. A phrase I said

they couldn’t write, by the way.
We’ve all heard it so often it makes
a cliché of the news, when a summary is

trying to be made. I think of today,
watching again students being interviewed,
saying they heard shots in the next room.

They locked themselves in. Later,
in shock, one said he didn’t know how
he would get his work done, hand in

his due paper. Until he realized
what he was saying for the wounded
and dead. What, I’m afraid,

my college has instructed me to note
first, at the beginning of the term
and now every day. The locks

on the windows and doors.
How a book can be used
to shield our hearts.

Friday links – June 6, 2014

HighWire Press moves away from the Stanford University Library and becomes HighWire Press, Inc. (HighWire Press sells their online journal platform as a product to journal publishers, including many academic societies in STEM fields, as well as major publishers such as Oxford University Press. Here is a list of their clients.)

While this is by no means the first technology transfer out of a university to an independent company, …, the transition of HighWire Press from an initiative of the library to a new corporate identity is one worth taking note of in our community.

If nothing else, it will be interesting to see how this move to for-profit corporate status will impact journal pricing in the near and long-term future.

Using Video Annotation Tools to Teach Film AnalysisSocialBook, a project from The Institute for the Future of the Book, has primarily been used as a tool for allowing groups to comment on books, whether on the book in general or at the level of individual paragraphs. The new video annotation tool works similarly, allowing users to comment either on the film in general or on individual shots. Students can enroll for SocialBook using their Twitter or Facebook login information or by creating a new account.

Leap Motion’s Gesture Control Finds Niche Uses In Medicine, Art and Augmented Reality – Though Leap’s early inspiration was to make 3D modeling more intuitive, comparisons to gesture-controlled sci-fi holographic displays led some to surmise the Leap controller could be an heir apparent to the touch screen and mouse.

Summer workshop at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction:
APPLIED CARTOONING: AN EDUCATOR’S SYMPOSIUM
“…Through lectures, workshops, and panel discussions this symposium will explore the many ways that educators and librarians can use cartooning to enrich any school or organization’s programming and curriculum.”

“Finishing the Term in the Library” – a poem

Thanks to poet Gary Margolis for sharing this timely work!

Finishing the Term
in the Library

It was most likely me
I’m remembering, one
of the last to leave,
to finish not sleeping

in the red leather chair.
Three floors down
from street level. Trying
to write the last sentence

of a semester’s paper.
Trying to become more
complete all by myself.
There in the stacks

there was another book
I’d rather be reading
and not searching for
a word to send me

home. Home being up
three flights, where tonight’s
late night librarian was closing
his book. Reading being all

he could do to pass the course
of his time. To close the big door
behind him. To turn off
the magnificent, fading, central

hall light. So the two of us could
walk out together, him to his car
and me to my passing, now-I’m-done
summer.

Friday Links – May 16, 2014

Tim Parson’s blog features a survey of “the twelve oldest trees on campus” featuring photos from the Archives in Special Collections in Davis Family Library.

Astronomy Welcomes New Experts - The Observatory will resume its public-viewing sessions thanks to two recent hires.

Here’s a short post on the Faculty and Staff Author’s reception held recently in Special Collections.   What isn’t mentioned here is that the food was FANTASTIC!  Don’t miss it next year!

New at go/lib: Ask a Midd Librarian

Thanks to lots of work from LIS staff members including Bryan and Ian, we’re trying out a new widget for the library home page. (Click on that link and scroll! You’ll notice what I’m talking about right away.)

The “Ask a Midd Librarian” widget should make it even easier for library users to get answers to their questions. It appears on every page of the library site. When librarians are logged in and available for chat, the widget says, “Chat with a Midd Librarian,” and clicking on the widget initiates a chat session. When we’re not logged, the text changes to, “Ask a Midd Librarian,” and clicking on it sends the person to a page that lists all the ways they can get help from us.

Scrolling widgets seem to be appearing all over the web these days, so it felt like a good time to test. Let us know what you think!

Friday Links – February 28, 2014

Audiobooks and the Return of Storytelling – Audiobooks are growing in popularity, returning us to childhood storytelling and invoking a literary tradition as old as the Illiad. Browse audiobooks at the library.

6 Innovative Uses of Lecture Capture – Teachers are increasingly using lecture capture tools for interactive lessons, content sharing, and multimedia assignments.

Alan Alda keynotes the meeting of the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) – discussing the importance of communication with the public in STEM fields. “… Some members of the U.S. Congress also struggle with jargon and therefore are faced with the ‘difficulty of giving money to something they don’t understand,’ Alda cautioned.”

Civil War Letters Come Home to Vermont - Featuring not only the letters, but also Rebekah Irwin and Special Collections!

Got my carrel! - From the Senior Admissions Fellows Blog.