Author Archives: Brenda Ellis

Open Access Journal PeerJ Publishes First Articles

From Library Journal / The Digital Shift:
“Multidisciplinary Open Access journal publisher PeerJ announced the publication of its first 30 peer-reviewed articles today. Co-founders Jason Hoyt, formerly chief scientist and VP for research and development for Mendeley, and Peter Binfield, formerly publisher of the Public Library Of Science (PLOS), launched PeerJ in June 2012. They quickly garnered support for the project, ultimately assembling an Editorial Board of 800 academics and an advisory board of 20—five of whom are Nobel Laureates…”
Full article.

Friday Links, Feb. 8, 2013

Worldometers: Real Time World Indicators
Watch the numbers change. Everything from current world population, CO2 emissions, to blog posts written today (hope they caught this one).  Strange, but no mention of the number of McDonald’s burgers sold?

The new library of Babel? Borges, digitisation and the myth of a universal library, by Christopher Rowe.  via First Monday.

Friday Links December 14, 2012

Marginalia, or The Roger Williams Code: How a team of scholars decrypted a secret language—and discovered the last known work of the American theologian. (via Slate)

Ithaka, the non-profit organization that brings us JSTOR, on Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians: This study, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, uncovers the needs of today’s historians and provides guidance for how research support providers can better serve them.

3D Printing:  Wondering what this technology is all about?  Read the latest CQ Researcher report “3D Printing: Will it revolutionize manufacturing?”  Trivia question: How was this technology used in the latest James Bond thriller “Skyfall”?

Some faculty and students have been reluctant to post undergraduate theses to Scholarship at Middlebury in part because they fear it could jeopardize their ability to publish the findings in journals later on. A report published in the Chronicle of Higher Education indicates there isn’t much cause for this kind of concern. (Read the comments too, where the validity of the conclusions is debated.) Putting Dissertation Online Isn’t an Obstacle to Print Publication, Surveys Find.

Bibliography of children’s and young adult books set in Vermont

The Green Mountain Sampler,” has been updated. On this fifty-page list are all the books that the Department of Libraries owns that are set in Vermont, or about Vermont or Vermonters. This is not a selected, recommended list, but rather an all inclusive one. It is here. (From VTlibraries listserv).

Celebrate Constitution Day, September 17th

You don’t have to be taking a class on constitutional law to reflect about the importance of the US Constitution or debate the issues.   There are library databases, publisher, government, and other websites that feature articles and other content to highlight or debate aspects of our Constitution.  Here are a few:

U.S. National Archives Constitution Day page
Also see their electronic version of the Constitution of the United States

NewsBank (publisher of the library database Archive  of Americana) Special Reports: The U.S. Constitution page

Find addtional library databases on the library subject guides.

JSTOR Journals – 2 new collections added

JSTOR – Collections V & VI added
Collection V title list. Description: “…important literary reviews and state historical journals. It will also widen the scope of core disciplines in the arts and humanities, such as philosophy, history, classics, religion, art and art history, and language and literature.”

Collection VI title list. Description: “…extends JSTOR’s coverage in disciplines across the social sciences, with clusters focused in economics, education, linguistics, political science, and area studies.”

See other library resources added recently here.