Author Archives: Brenda Ellis

Bibliographic Essay: Online Educational Videos

The August 2013 issue of Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries (Midd subscribes) had a bibliographic essay is entitled: “Teaching and Learning with Online Educational Videos: A Subject List of Web Resources for Educators.”  It describes both general sources for a variety of subjects (such as open course ware sites, lecture sites, etc.) available on YouTube and elsewhere and also provides a subject listing.  Resources range from popular sites to more academic.

WashingtonPost.com – Free online access

If you like reading recent articles from the Washington Post from their website, rather than in print or from full-text library databases, you can sign up for a free account if your email ends in .edu (or .mil, or .gov).  Register here.

Site access is for the latest month only – it does not include the archive.  Nonsubscribers get 20 free articles from the current site per month.

LIS Workshops: find summer reading, movies, & more + website development

LIS Workshop:  Library Services & Resources at Middlebury

Wed, 5/28,  2:00 – 3:00 pm  Davis Family Library 105 Computing Lab (lower level)

We’ll introduce you to library services and resources available to Midd users and show you how to search MIDCAT, the library catalog, and Summon (our “search everything” tool) to discover resources like books, articles, films, eBooks, audiobooks, and more.  Learn how to access news and popular magazines online as well as find online resources aimed at all ages.

Website Maintenance Work Session

Thu, 5/29,   1:00 – 2:30 pm  Davis Family Library 105 Computing Lab (lower level)

Do you maintain a website in Drupal, WordPress, MediaWiki (wiki), or Moodle?  Bring your work to this session and we’ll have staff on-hand to help you with any questions as you update or create your site.  This is not a formal workshop; we will answer questions and problems as they come up.  Work sessions will be staffed on a rotating basis by representatives from each of the following areas:  Web Application Development, Curricular Technology, and User Services.

Sign up online or visit http://go.middlebury.edu/lisworkshops to view the full workshop schedule.

Friday links – May 9, 2014

Net Neutrality – at risk again, now by the FCC.

Open-Source Software for College Administrators Reaches ‘Tipping Point’ After 10 Years – In 2004, when information-technology leaders at Indiana University and the University of Hawaii announced plans to develop a financial-management system for higher education and distribute it free, they met plenty of skepticism.

SisOps: Girl Friendly Tech Programs (article)
Provides descriptions of a number of different programs and opportunities for girls to get interested in and use technology.  From School Library Journal.

Friday links – December 13, 2013

Can scholarly publishing evolve beyond the pdf? “…includes a brief history of digital publishing, and a look at how PDF and HTML have evolved. In spite of significant usability improvements, rich linking, and supporting information in HTML full-text articles, researchers still choose PDF over HTML 65% of the time.”

The allure of the print book “… But when I touched that physical book again for the first time in years, it was like the moment you hear a nostalgic song on the radio and are instantly lost in it. The feeling of a print book, with its rough paper and thick spine, is an absorbing and pleasurable experience — sometimes more so than reading on a device. …”

Validation – What happens when garage attendant meets DMV photographer.  Watch this if you need a smile or holiday pick-me-upper.  Yes this is work related – recommended by Middlebury’s Dale Carnegie trainer.

Friday Links – Nov. 15, 2013

For those of you with kids, this article “Teach Kids how to Code, Make Apps and 3-D Models With These Tools” lists some interesting possibilities. From School Library Journal and The Digital Shift.

Announcement: “Digital Public Library of America Launches DPLA Bookshelf

DPLA Bookshelf lets the user scroll a visual representation of a bookshelf… When a user of the DPLA site searches for books, the results are displayed as books on a bookshelf; the shelf is shown as a vertical stack so that the titles and authors are more easily readable on their spines. The width of the book represents the actual height of the physical book, and its thickness represents its page count. The spine is colored with one of ten depths of blue to “heatmap” how relevant the work is to the reader’s search.” Follow the announcement link to learn more.

3D Printing is a hot topic, but have you heard of 3D scanning? Lucky for us – the Smithsonian has, and has been busy scanning several artifacts that you can now view online! Their 3D exploration tool is in Beta so they are looking for feedback and bug reports. Load time is a little slow – but it’s worth it! (Check out the Woolly Mammoth!)

Smithsonian X 3D of a Wooly Mammoth, http://3d.si.edu/explorer?modelid=55

Screen shot of Smithsonian X 3D of a Woolly Mammoth

Curious about how 3D scanning works? Check out the video below.

 

 

Are you interested in learning more about infographics?

Lynda.com offers a collection of resources about creating infographics that can be found at this link: http://www.lynda.com/Infographics-training-tutorials/1462-0.html (after you log in using your Middlebury credentials). Not sure what an infographic is? Check out this example on the history of audio equipment via fastcodesign.com where the creators offer a mini-window into the work it took to pull it all together.

The Wilson Media Lab in the Library offers many multimedia tools that can be used to build infographics. Digital Media Tutors are available Sunday – Thursday from 1 pm – 1 am and on Fridays from 1 pm – 7 pm to assist users interested in using these tools.

 

 

LIS at the Student Services Fair

This year LIS met loads of incoming Middlebury students at the Student Services Fair. Brenda Ellis, Pij Slater, Stacy Reardon and Ian Burke staffed the table along with Helpdesk students Biswash Ghimire and Anis Mebarki. Ian distributed handouts on Cyber Security Awareness Month while Stacy and Brenda passed out shiny new LIS bookmarks with handy go/ links. The team spoke with students about connecting to wireless and avoiding phishing attacks. Students had quite a few questions of their own:

  • How do I print?
  • How long can I check out books from the library?
  • How do I find books at the library?
  • How do I get a job at the library?
  • How do I get MS Office?
  • Can I get the books I need for my classes at the library?

Students were very enthusiastic about library services. One student ran over to tell us, “The Middlebury library was probably a bigger factor in my college decision than it should have been!” (We politely disagreed. The quality of the library is indeed a very important factor!)

The library’s iPad was put to good use at the Fair, and students appeared to be satisfied with the help they received. We even heard an unprompted, “Always ask a librarian!” as they departed.