Author Archives: Brenda Ellis

Developer Maps NY Public Library Photo Archives

Library Journal article about “the launch of OldNYC.org, a website that overlays photo locations on a Google Maps interface, enabling visitors to explore the collection by zooming, dragging, and clicking their way around an online map of the city.”  Not only is this interesting to see, it could be useful for students interested in seeing old NYC architecture.  Also discusses a similar project for San Francisco.

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Friday Links – January 23, 2015

NEH & Mellon Announce Pilot Grant Program to Digitize Out of Print Books in Humanities and Make Them Available With CC License  (From infoDOCKET / Library Journal)

Experimental Meadowhawk Module Featured in Mercedes-Benz’s CES Concept Car – Embedded into the console, Leap Motion’s Meadowhawk modules allow drivers to access an experimental natural user interface.

CES 2015: Five big 3D printing trends to shape the year ahead – When it comes to 3D printing, the theme of 2015 is simple: make it useful. The last couple years has been exciting for fans of the technology and people in the industry, as it has developed so rapidly it has been hard to keep up with.

Friday Links – October 17, 2014

Time for a Thesis – From the Senior Admissions Fellows Blog, a self-reflective essay by a History major on the impact of our annual message to seniors about thesis carrel signup and research support. His conclusion is quite nice: “When I think ahead to the books and research, I am not so much nervous as I am excited,” he says.

Practicing Collaborative Digital Pedagogy to Foster Digital Literacies in Humanities Classrooms – This article presents two case studies of classes who employed different techniques to “foster digital literacies in humanities students using distinct approaches for each course.” My key takeaway hinged on one student’s observation: “Through creating an infographic in Easel.ly, I learned that it is very important to develop skills in being able to pick out important information from the vast amounts that you can easily find online.”

How Stress Affects the Brain During Learning – A fight or flight reaction may be useful in some situations, but it is highly detrimental in the classroom. Whether anxiety stems from test taking or from an unstable home environment, the brains of students experiencing high levels of stress look different than those who are not — and those brains behave differently, too. In this article, we’ll take a look at the neural and hormonal responses that underpin a student’s stress response, and make a few suggestions for continuing to teach through the challenges it presents.

Upcoming Battery Will Charge Phones And Electric Cars in Minutes – It takes about an hour to fully charge a cell phone, and the battery lasts about two to three years over 500 charge cycles. However, a new design could reduce charge time to only a few minutes and the battery is expected to last for 10,000 charge cycles over a 20 year lifespan.

FireChat in Hong Kong: How an app tapped its way into the protests
(CNN) — The revolution will not be televised but it will be tweeted, instant messaged or, in the case of Hong Kong, broadcast on mesh networks like FireChat.

 

Friday Links – October 10, 2014

How tech is changing the way we think and what we think about – There are a myriad of arguments for and against the increased use of technology in everyday life. Futurists and technophiles encourage its use, sure that technology will welcome a new utopia, while luddites rail against the “destructive” nature of technology use.

The Next Wave of Tech Change | Self-Publishing & Libraries (from Library Journal)

Trust, Privacy, Big Data, and E-book readers “… the Amazon Kindle platform is as much a data ingest tool for providing end-user behavior data to Amazon as it is a sales platform for digital media content,…” … “It seems that counter to this trend, libraries and scholarly publishers are the exception to the rule. Whether our community will remain outliers and whether this status is a good thing or not over the long run, remains to be seen.”

Lunch time Learning: Library Services & Resources at Middlebury

Wed. Sept. 3rd, noon – 1pm, Davis Family Library Computer Lab (DFL 105) – lower level.  Drop-ins welcome or sign-up online (use the last box to tell us if there is something specific you want covered).

Description: Bring your lunch to the library and learn about what we have to offer you and your family.  We’ll introduce you to library services and resources available to Midd users and their families and show you how to search MIDCAT, the library catalog, and Summon (our “search everything” tool) to discover resources like books, articles, films, eBooks, audiobooks, and more. Learn how to access news and popular magazines online as well as find online resources aimed at all ages.  Questions will be answered throughout the session.

Friday Links – August 15

How Successful People Stay Calm (from LinkedIn)

  • Article explains optimal stress and includes 10 best strategies for managing stress (and emotions).

Churnalism: When Press Releases Masquerade as News Stories

  • British YouTube video illustrating “churnalism” (media articles based on press releases) with examples of how some fake press releases made it into mainstream media.  By Churnalism.com (promotes their churnalism detection extension for Chrome and Firefox). (Shared on the ili-l listserv by Maryke Barber).

Demand Media Infographic

  • Infographic illustrating how “content mills” work based on one example.  Shows how content (matching web search terms) is written for the internet to generate ad sales. (Also shared on the ili-l listserv by Maryke Barber).

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) seeks to weed out ‘predatory’ OA journals.

… following criticism of [DOAJ’s] quality-control checks, the website is asking all of the journals in its directory to reapply on the basis of stricter criteria. It hopes the move will weed out ‘predatory journals’: those that profess to publish research openly, often charging fees, but that are either outright scams or do not provide the services a scientist would expect, such as a minimal standard of peer review or permanent archiving …

More background and perspective from Rick Anderson via the Scholarly Kitchen.