Friday links – August 2, 2013

Flipped Classroom

Created by Knewton and Column Five Media

University of Oregon Ripple: An open source mobile audience participation application.

Web Content

Universal Analytics and user-centric analytics: What Google’s new Universal Analytics platform is doing and what it might be positioned to do in the future to track individual users across multiple devices.

Social Media in Higher Education: A curated Flipboard of articles from the last month on this topic, with many focusing on analytics.

4 Tips From Google To Make Your Website More Compelling: Resist organizing content according to pre-formed taxonomies of ideas and try to think from the user’s perspective–then make sure to test and test again with real users.

Higher Education Search Analysis Q2 2013: Good news for Middlebury! Searches for higher education resources with a strong relation to the liberal arts and a residential location were up compared to last year.

Facebook adds embedded posts

Google launches real-time analytics API beta

Matt Mullenweg: State of the Word 2013: Matt discusses the upcoming 3.6, 3.7, and 3.8 versions of WordPress. The release video for 3.6 is at about 7:00 and features native audio and video embed support and a better revision browser. 3.8 will include a redesigned administration interface and is slated for release this December.

 

Web Development

Protect Your Website From Its Embedded Content: Security considerations for the new sandbox and seamless attributes to the iFrame element.

Facebook’s Huxley and the BBC’s Wraith: UI testing tools that compare screenshots of your web application and lets you know if things change that you aren’t expecting to change.

Google PageSpeed Insights: Updated to include tips for mobile speed improvements.

Reading

Students Prefer Print for Serious Academic Reading: A study that will be published in College & Research Libraries shows that while students read for pleasure on devices, they prefer print for academic work. Among other reasons, this preference may owe to print being a less distracting medium, with easier ways to highlight and take notes.

The Professor Who Declared, It’s J.K. Rowling: Stylometry software was used to help build the case that J.K. Rowling penned crime novel The Cuckoo’s Calling under a pseudonym. The comments to this article are great reading, too.

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