Health Professions & STEM Advising

July 22, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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Dr. Paid Less: An Old Title Still Fits Female Physicians

Several studies have found a persistent pay gap between male and female doctors. According to a recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine, female physicians at some of the nation’s most prominent public medical schools earn nearly $20,000 less a year on average than their male colleagues. The researchers went to great lengths to account for a variety of factors that can influence income, such as the volume of patients seen by a physician and the number of publications he or she had written.

Read the full New York Times article by Catherine Saint Louis.

May 11, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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Midd Grad Creates New Medical Student Publication!

After graduating Middlebury College (’13), Ethan Litman worked at the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. It was his combined experiences at Middlebury and Children’s Hospital that led him to launch The Palate, a peer-reviewed online publication for medical students at the intersection of nutrition and public health.

The Palate seeks to engage medical students in conversations that explore the connections between nutrition and the health of our patients, communities, and ourselves. We envision a future where nutrition is an integral part of health care practice and medical education.

If you are interested in contributing to The Palate, please contact us at editorinchief@thepalate.org. We seek manuscripts on all topics related to nutrition and public health, including the current obesity epidemic, food inequalities and insecurities, and our food environment.

 

May 11, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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Middlebury Senior Presents Neuroscience Research at Posters on the Hill

Middlebury senior Kristin Knutzen recently presented findings from her independent research at the highly selective Posters on the Hill event in Washington, D.C.  The annual two-day event, sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), took place April 20 at the U.S. Capitol Building and featured the work of 60 elite undergraduate students from across the country. Read more here.

March 28, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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Math Majors – Have YOU Visited the Mathematical Association of America Website?

Mathematics opens the doors to many promising career paths. CareerCast ranked mathematician as best job for 2014 based on four factors: environment, income, outlook, and stress.  Statistician was ranked third and actuary was ranked fourth. A study by PayScale shows that the top 15 highest-earning college degrees have a common element: mathematics. Not only do many professions and majors (engineering, doctors, physics, nurses, computer science, actuarial science, etc.) require courses in mathematics, but the analytical and problem-solving skills students learn in mathematics can apply to all disciplines. The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is committed to providing information that helps students understand their options.

Read more about possible math careers here.

Other helpful links for Math Careers:

March 14, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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12 of the Top 20 Most Satistying Careers are in Health Professions or STEM

According to the Business Insider’s article on The 20 College Majors That Lead to the Most Satisfying Careers, 12 of the top 20 jobs are in Health Professions or STEM fields!

For some, the best jobs are the ones that make the world a better place, and choosing the right college major can help get you there.

PayScale recently filtered its salary data from this year’s College Salary Report based on the percentage of respondents who said their careers have high meaning.

Read the full article here.

 

February 29, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
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Updated Resource for Students Who Love Numbers

Another interesting resource for our STEM population:

Many rewarding careers today involve numbers. Numbers may not be the central focus of these professions, but they can serve as critical building blocks of a larger and more meaningful whole. Mechanical engineers, for example, work with numbers for the design and production of all types of simple and complex machines. Actuaries use numbers to calculate and assess the consequences of financial risk. And economists analyze and interpret quantitative data to discern macro- and micro-economic patterns. If you enjoy working with numbers, whether crunching them constantly or calculating occasionally, a wide range of careers out there give you the chance to nurture your numerical need.

Check out Careers for Numbers People: STEM, Silicon Valley & Beyond and let us know what you think. It can be found here: http://www.learnhowtobecome.org/careers-for-numbers-people/

Sites DOT MiddleburyThe Middlebury site network.