Health Professions & STEM Advising

August 9, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Cost of Interviewing for Medical School

Attending medical school is not cheap! According to the AAMC, the average cost of attendance for one year at a public medical school is about $35,000.00 for in-state students and close to $60,000.00 for out-of-state students. This figure does not include books, housing and living expenses! Tuition and fees at private schools average well over $52,000 a year regardless of whether you’re an in-state or out-of-state student. There are a number of “hidden costs” accrued in obtaining a medical degree, beginning with the cost of preparing for and taking the MCATS, the first financial investment in your medical education. The next big expenditure that applicants face is the cost of the AMCAS application and secondary fees, and then comes the cost of interviewing. We had long wondered exactly how much it costs to interview for medical school, and with the help of our summer student, we surveyed our Matric 16 cohort to find out exactly how much money they spent interviewing.

We designed a survey that asked students how many interviews they went on, how much money they spent per interview, and how many miles they traveled to interview. We also asked them to share any pearls of wisdom they gleaned from the interview process that they wanted to pass along. Attached you will find a spreadsheet with the raw survey data from the 23 respondents as well as their advice.

Summary:

The average Matric 16 cohort member attended 6.4 interviews, spent $417.00 per interview for a total of $3144.00. Whew.

There was a lot of great advice offered, but perhaps the single best nugget was,”Relax and be yourself above all else! Best to present the real you because you will be able to find the school that best suits you”.

Handouts:

August 4, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

HoloLens Lets Med Students Hold A Beating Heart In Their Hands

Medical students at Case Western Reserve University will soon be able to remove the heart from an otherwise perfectly healthy person without being accused of flagrant malpractice. That’s because a technology called HoloLens provides them the opportunity to dissect a virtual human body that is alive and ticking. Watch a video of the technology in action and read the full Vocativ article by Jonathan Sanger.

For more information about HoloLens, please visit hololens.com.

August 3, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Paging Dr. Pigeon; You’re Needed in Radiology

The pigeons’ training environment at the University of Iowa included a food pellet dispenser, a touch-sensitive screen that projected medical images, and blue and yellow choice buttons on either side. Credit University of Iowa/Wassermann Lab

Dogs that detect cancer? Check. Fruit flies can do it? Check.

Now pigeons?

Read the full New York Times article by Nikolas Bakalar.

The pigeons were quick to learn to discriminate benign from malignant breast tissue in the first experiment, averaging 87 percent correct scores on slides they had trained with and 85 percent even with slides they had never seen.

August 2, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Astronomers push for a more diverse, inclusive community

In a move to bolster the astronomy community’s efforts to expand the representation and participation of underrepresented minorities in the field, the American Astronomical Society (AAS) last week endorsed the vision of an inclusive community that emerged from the 2015 Inclusive Astronomy meeting. In addition to the endorsed vision statement, that meeting led to specific suggestions for helping departments and institutions improve diversity and inclusion—including strategies to create an inclusive environment, remove obstacles that prevent some students from continuing on to graduate programs, and broaden involvement in making decisions that affect the community. Read the full Science Magazine article by Maggie Kuo.

July 22, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Dr. Paid Less: An Old Title Still Fits Female Physicians

Several studies have found a persistent pay gap between male and female doctors. According to a recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine, female physicians at some of the nation’s most prominent public medical schools earn nearly $20,000 less a year on average than their male colleagues. The researchers went to great lengths to account for a variety of factors that can influence income, such as the volume of patients seen by a physician and the number of publications he or she had written.

Read the full New York Times article by Catherine Saint Louis.

May 11, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Midd Grad Creates New Medical Student Publication!

After graduating Middlebury College (’13), Ethan Litman worked at the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. It was his combined experiences at Middlebury and Children’s Hospital that led him to launch The Palate, a peer-reviewed online publication for medical students at the intersection of nutrition and public health.

The Palate seeks to engage medical students in conversations that explore the connections between nutrition and the health of our patients, communities, and ourselves. We envision a future where nutrition is an integral part of health care practice and medical education.

If you are interested in contributing to The Palate, please contact us at editorinchief@thepalate.org. We seek manuscripts on all topics related to nutrition and public health, including the current obesity epidemic, food inequalities and insecurities, and our food environment.

 

May 11, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Middlebury Senior Presents Neuroscience Research at Posters on the Hill

Middlebury senior Kristin Knutzen recently presented findings from her independent research at the highly selective Posters on the Hill event in Washington, D.C.  The annual two-day event, sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), took place April 20 at the U.S. Capitol Building and featured the work of 60 elite undergraduate students from across the country. Read more here.

March 28, 2016
by Nicole Veilleux
0 comments

Math Majors – Have YOU Visited the Mathematical Association of America Website?

Mathematics opens the doors to many promising career paths. CareerCast ranked mathematician as best job for 2014 based on four factors: environment, income, outlook, and stress.  Statistician was ranked third and actuary was ranked fourth. A study by PayScale shows that the top 15 highest-earning college degrees have a common element: mathematics. Not only do many professions and majors (engineering, doctors, physics, nurses, computer science, actuarial science, etc.) require courses in mathematics, but the analytical and problem-solving skills students learn in mathematics can apply to all disciplines. The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is committed to providing information that helps students understand their options.

Read more about possible math careers here.

Other helpful links for Math Careers:

Sites DOT MiddleburyThe Middlebury site network.