Tag Archives: Faculty Grants

Frank Winkler receives grant from NASA’s Space Telescope Science Institute for Collaborative Research

Frank Winkler (Emeritus Professor, Physics) has been awarded funding from the NASA-funded Space Telescope Science Institute for his role in a collaborative research project involving researchers at Curtin University in Australia and Johns Hopkins University. This project entails observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and is titled Diagnosing the super-Eddington accretion/outflow regime using the microquasar MQ1 in M83. The goal of the observations, which come as a follow-up to previous studies from Hubble and from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, is to better understand an unusual black hole in the southern spiral galaxy M83, also known as the southern pinwheel. Previous studies suggest that the black hole provides the energy source for radiation in excess of what simple physics models allow (the “Eddington limit”) , and has done so for thousands of years. The team hopes to learn how this is possible, or else why this interpretation may be incorrect.

Michael Linderman receives NIH grant for genomic literacy assessment tool

Michael Linderman (Computer Science) has received funding from the National Institutes of Health for a research project entitled Developing a Genomics Literacy Measure. This NIH Small Grant, awarded to Michael earlier this year while he was at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has been transferred to Middlebury. The grant will fund the development and validation of a new measure to assess genomic literacy that is reliable across diverse groups of examinees. This tool will enable the rigorous measurement of genomic literacy in the general population and the evaluation of educational programs designed to improve genomic literacy.

Ioana Uricaru receives major prize from Romanian National Center for Cinema

Ioana Uricaru (Film and Media Culture) has received a major prize from the Romanian National Center for Cinema’s annual production support competition. This grant provides production support for a film titled Honeymoon/Lemonade which  tells the story of a Romanian single mother who is a recent immigrant to the US. Lemonade was previously developed through the Cannes Film Festival’s Cinefondation Residency and the Sundance Screenwriters’ and Directors’ Labs. This project is the focus of Ioana’s academic leave  next year as a writer director. The grant amount of €656,000 was the largest awarded in this year’s competition and will cover about 70% of the film’s costs.

AJ Vasiliou receives ACS PRF New Investigator Award

AnGayle (AJ) Vasiliou (Chemistry and Biochemistry) has received an Undergraduate New Investigator grant from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for a project titled Sulfur Chemistry: Molecular Mechanisms. The proposed work seeks to answer questions regarding the reaction mechanisms for the thermal decomposition of sulfur compounds. Because raw energy sources such as coal, petroleum, and biomass all contain varying quantities of sulfur contaminants, this work should provide useful information for improving sulfur removal technologies. Six Middlebury undergraduates will be working with AJ on this project.

Will Amidon receives ACS PRF research grant

Will Amidon (Geology) has received an Undergraduate Research grant from American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for a project titled Post-Rift Tectonism on Circum-Atlantic Margins. The goal of this research is to study the history of geologically recent mountain uplift and erosion in the northeastern U.S., where offshore sediment records suggest subtle tectonism occurred in the Late Cretaceous and Miocene. This work should provide basic information on when modern topography in the northeastern U.S. developed and also provide information about the stratigraphic evolution of Atlantic-style passive margins where many petroleum bearing deposits are formed. Six Middlebury undergraduates will be working with Will on this project.

Nick Muller receives grant funding from the Environmental Protection Agency

Nick Muller (Economics) has received funding from the Environmental Protection Agency for two different collaborative research projects. With colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, he is working on a project titled Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) Center: Science Supporting Solutions. The goal of this research is to explore the interface between air pollution, climate change and energy use. With colleagues at the University of California-Davis, he is working on a project titled Optimal Energy Portfolios to Sustain Economic Advantage, Achieve GHG Targets, and Minimize PM2. This research explores air pollution, climate change, and economic activity in California. These grants provide salary funding for his 17-18 academic leave and summers for the next three years.

Ioana Uricaru receives Berlin Prize from the American Academy in Berlin

Ioana Uricaru (Film and Media Culture) has been awarded one of this year’s Berlin Prizes by the American Academy in Berlin in support of Paperclip, a screenplay  and film project that she will be working on during her academic leave in 2016-2017. This residential fellowship provides a stipend and housing during Fall 2016 when she will be doing research in German museums, libraries, and archives related to the screenplay, which is set in German at the end of World War II.

Lorraine Besser awarded grant from a Templeton Foundation-funded initiative

Lorraine Besser (Philosophy) has received support from a Templeton Foundation-funded initiative called the Happiness and Well-Being Project, based at St. Louis University. She and a collaborator at the University of Virginia received a two year grant to work on an interdisciplinary project titled What is the Good Life? The Happy Life, the Perfectionist Life, or the Psychologically Rich Life? This project investigates the possibility that a psychologically rich life is a candidate for the good life. They will conduct a series of studies to determine whether or not people consider a psychologically rich life to be a good life and to determine whether such people structure their lives differently from people who consider happiness or perfection to be the good life.

Council on Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Institute applications are due June 17, 2016

Are you working on writing a grant proposal for research or academic programming? Here is a resource that may be helpful.

The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) is offering a Proposal Writing Institute (PWI) on August 4-8, 2016 at the Kellogg West Conference Center & Hotel, Pomona CA.

Deadline: June 17, 2016. Applications reviewed on a rolling basis; institute may reach capacity prior to application deadline.

Summary: The four-day institute assists novice to experienced proposal writers in drafting complete proposals for submission. Cost of attendance is $1500 plus travel costs. Most meals and housing are included. Partial support for faculty members who want to attend may be available; contact OGSP for more information about support.

Please note: If you have NOT identified a funding source and begun writing a draft proposal, you should NOT participate in this Institute, as it is geared for writing and revising draft proposals.

Details:

The PWI brings together faculty and administrators interested in preparing proposals for submission to external funding agencies. The four-day institute will consist of one-on-one work with a mentor, writing, small group discussions, and critiquing of proposals. The institute has been developed to assist novice to experienced proposal writers in drafting complete proposals for submission. Prior to the institute participants will be able to access information that will help them begin to draft their proposal.

Applicants must apply online and submit a one to two paragraph outline of their proposal and the name of the intended funding agency and/or program in the on-line application. Time at the Institute will consist of periods of proposal preparation interspersed with one-on-one mentoring by experienced and successful proposal writers, members of grants review panels, former program officers, and/or Directors of Sponsored Programs Offices. Small group discussions and group critiquing sessions round out the Institute. Participants who come well prepared and who work hard should be able to leave the Institute with a completed (or nearly completed) proposal to the granting agency of their choice.

The week before the Institute, accepted participants will be expected to submit a draft of their proposal, and a link to the specific program announcement/RFP. Participants are encouraged to have as much as possible completed in advance, which will increase the likelihood of departing the Institute with a nearly finished proposal.

A $50.00 application fee is due at the time of application. Should you be accepted to attend the Institute, your application fee will be applied to your tuition fee. In the event that CUR does not accept your application, the $50.00 application fee will be refunded. The tuition fee for the Institute includes most meals and housing (double occupancy; requests for a single room are available at an additional cost).

 

Pat Manley receives award from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation

Pat Manley (Geology) has been awarded a fellowship from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation for a project titled Reading the Rocks: A History of Modern Geology. The grant will fund travel in England and Scotland this summer to geologic locations that are key to understanding the history of modern geology and to museums and historic sites that will bring to life the geologists who founded this field. Pat’s goal is to enhance her teaching of introductory and advanced geology by adding sections on the history of geologic thought.