Author Archives: JoAnn Brewer

WINTER TERM, 2016 CONTEMPORARY TEACHING IN THE LIBERAL ARTS: INTENTIONAL PEDAGOGY, INTENTIONAL TEACHING

The Center for Teaching, Learning & Research is pleased to present a selection of roundtable discussions and workshops that explore intentional teaching and learning practices. The series includes presentations and conversations to inspire, challenge, and educate Middlebury faculty, staff, and students on topics such as creating community in the classroom, intentional curricular design, inclusive pedagogies, universal design, and contemplative practice.

The Contemporary teaching series continues during Winter Term on Mondays and Thursdays, and all sessions include lunch. For more information and to sign up for individual sessions, please visit the series website.

Writing for the Public

Tuesday, January 26, 4:30 CTLR Suite

Guest Lecturer: Anne Trubek

 Writing for general audiences—readers of The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Chronicle of Higher Education and other serious outlets for journalism, say—is fun, energizing and, sometimes, profitable. It allows scholars to connect their research to current events (are you a scholar of Islam? There is an audience for your expertise!), culture (how might Adele’s decision not to stream relate to similar changes in the distribution of art historically?) science (your study of the changing habitats of bats is of interest to environmentalists) and more. But academia does not always provide incentive for or assistance with writing op-eds or researched articles in the ‘popular press,’ leaving faculty and staff at a loss as to how to get their ideas more widely disseminated and read  by non-specialists.

In the talk we will discuss how the submission process works, how to develop ideas that will interest editors, common obstacles academics encounter when working with non-academic editors, and how to craft clear, engaging prose. Additional information and registration here.

Co-sponsored by Academic Administration, CTLR, and the Writing Program.

Winter Term, 2016 Contemporary Teaching in the Liberal Arts: Intentional Pedagogy, Intentional Teaching

The Center for Teaching, Learning & Research is pleased to present a selection of roundtable discussions and workshops that explore intentional teaching and learning practices. The series includes presentations and conversations to inspire, challenge, and educate Middlebury faculty, staff, and students on topics such as creating community in the classroom, intentional curricular design, inclusive pedagogies, universal design, and contemplative practice.

Opening presentation and discussion: Tuesday, January 12, 11 am, CTLR Suite Inequality in higher education: a wicked problem for liberal arts institutions” by Bryan Alexander

The Contemporary teaching series continues during Winter Term on Mondays and Thursdays, and all sessions include lunch. For more information and to sign up for individual sessions, please visit the series website.

Academic Roundtable – Faculty Online Identities

Please join us on Tuesday, December 8, 2015, in the Davis Family Library 105B at 12:15 PM.

A curriculum vitae is one of many options for sharing your scholarly and teaching work. In the age of digital connections, it is now possible to have a professional website or digital portfolio that allows you to share work with new audiences. How do our colleagues share themselves and their work online? What kinds of digital environments blur the lines between our work, the work students do in our classes and public spheres? Join us for a roundtable discussion highlighting how some faculty have chosen to share their work digitally. Our discussion will be led by Professor Mark Sample, Associate Professor of Digital Studies, and Kristen Eshleman, Director of Digital Learning Research & Design, both from Davidson College.

Mark and Kristen will share their experiences of launching Davidson Domains, a pilot program “what gives faculty, staff, and students a ‘domain of one’s own’—and online space for blogs, exhibits, research, creative work, portfolios, web development, programming, and more” (Sample, 2015). One goal of the Davidson Domains project is to help Davidson community members to “forge a digital identity through online publishing.” Mark and Kristen will share their perspectives on the pilot and how it has impacted the sharing of faculty and student work to broader audiences.

As time allows, we’ll turn to a discussion of how Middlebury faculty share their digital presences and discuss what questions and decisions drove their choices for creating a digital presence.

Learn more about the Davidson Domains project here: https://domains.davidson.edu/

Sample, M. (2015). What are the bottlenecks of Davidson Domains?

Lunch will be provided. RSVP to Doreen Bernier via email at dbernier@middlebury.edu by 5 PM on Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.

Academic Roundtable – Microaggressions, Trigger Warnings, Campus Climate, and the Classroom

Please join us on Tuesday, November 10, 2015, in the Center forTeaching, Learning & Research, LIB 225 at 12:15 PM.

How do recent debates and discussions on campus and in the national press around the topics of microaggressions and trigger warnings impact what happens in our classroom? How do we identify microaggressions that may have made their way into our speech patterns? How do we decide whether or not to issue ‘trigger warnings’ in advance of dealing with potentially difficult topics in our classrooms? Join us for discussion of these important topics. Miguel Fernandez of the Spanish & Portuguese Department and Acting Chief Diversity Officer and Allison Stanger of the Political Science Department will offer some preliminary perspectives to help frame our discussion. You are encouraged to read in advance the following articles that help illuminate the contours of the national debate on these subjects.

The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt

What Is the Point of College? By Kwame Anthony Appiah

Lunch will be provided. RSVP to Doreen Bernier via email at dbernier@middlebury.edu by 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, 2015.

Academic Roundtable – What is Open Access and Why You Should Care About It

Please join us on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 in the Center for Teaching, Learning & Research, LIB 225, at 12:15 PM

Middlebury College has just formed an Open Access working group to investigate this question. To kick start that process, we’ve invited Bryn Geffert, the College Librarian for Amherst College, who will lead us through Amherst’s work in this area. He’ll discuss the practical, philosophical, and legal rationale for pursuing an open access resolution; the questions, fears, and aspirations that surfaced during the debate preceding a vote; and Amherst’s other efforts to promote open access.

You can learn more about the Open Access working group at http://go.middlebury.edu/openaccess/.

You can learn more about Amherst’s Open Access policy, by going to:

Open Access Resolution  https://www.amherst.edu/library/services/facstaff/openaccessresolution

Open Access FAQ https://www.amherst.edu/library/services/facstaff/openaccessfaq

Open Access Faculty Procedures https://www.amherst.edu/library/services/facstaff/openaccessinstructions

 

Lunch will be served.  To sign up for lunch, email Doreen Bernier, dbernier@middlebury.edu by noon on Monday, April 13, 2015

The Academic Roundtable is co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, & Research and the Library.

Contemporary Issues in the Liberal Arts – Winter Term Series

Lunch will be served at each event in the Center for Teaching, Learning & Research 12 – 1 pm. Please RSVP using the sign up form at least two days in advance of the event. Thank you.

Monday, January 19, 2015  11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Classroom Discussion Part II: Navigating Controversial Topics

When controversial or difficult topics become central parts of classroom conversations they are likely to engage student’s deeply held preconceptions and convictions and may arouse powerful emotional responses. These exchanges may become heated, but a thoughtful, well‐facilitated discussion can have many benefits as students get the opportunity to learn from their peers and explore new ways of understanding the world. Moreover, the encouragement of mutual respect during the course of disagreement can encourage students to feel more confident as they enter into difficult conversations in the future.


Thursday, January 22, 2015  11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Adventures in Team Teaching Across the Disciplines

What are the benefits and challenges of team teaching across the disciplines?  Andi Lloyd, Chris McGrory Klyza, Tim Spears, and Steve Trombulak will offer perspectives on their own recent experiences with this form of teaching.   Their perspectives will frame a discussion about innovating as teachers and pursuing the full potential of a liberal arts education.


Monday, January 26, 2015  11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Pedagogical Challenges in Online Education

Ian Grimmer, a Senior Lecturer in modern European intellectual history and the director of the Integrated Humanities Program at the University of Vermont, will discuss the dramatic shift to online education in UVM’s summer session and some of its many implications for teaching practices in view of the differences in the online environment.


Thursday, January 29, 2015

Hybrid Learning and the Liberal Arts

Bryan Alexander, writer, futurist and Senior Researcher at the New Media Consortium, will address some of the issues surrounding hybrid learning and its impact on the academy. Before hybrid, we spoke of an opposition between traditional, face-to-face learning and wholly online, or distance education.  We will soon consider learning as existing along a continuum of different levels of technological integration; all will be considered learning.

What powers this transformation?  First, a set of technological innovations, widely adopted: mobile, social, and rich media computing.  Second, the growth of open content and access to scholarly publication.  Third, demographic shifts, as digitally familiar cohorts age into college faculty and administration.

 

See our full schedule here: http://sites.middlebury.edu/ctlrprogramming

Digital Media Bootcamp 2015

Please sign-up for sessions at http://sites.middlebury.edu/ct/digital-media-bootcamp-2015/

If the session you would like to attend is filled, please contact Joe Antonioli via email jantonio@middlebury.edu

 Online Identity: Your Story to the World @ 1pm

Date: January 19, 2015

Instructor: Joe Antonioli – With every click, post, tweet, checkout, like, search, digg, friend, tag and other activities we have created a record of our time spent interacting with web sites that are viewable from anywhere in the world. What do our web sites and social media activity say about us? This workshop will explore the meaning that others give to our online identities, and present some strategies for managing our identities in the digital space. NOTE: Attendees must be comfortable with having their name searched for.

 

Portfolios Using WordPress @ 2:45pm

Date: January 19, 2015

Instructor: Heather Stafford – WordPress is best known as a blogging platform, however its flexibility and ease of use also makes it a great option to use to display your digital work. Join us as we explore the best way to configure WordPress as a showcase for your expertise. Participants should come prepared with some ideas and materials that they wish to highlight.

 

Moodle and WordPress @ 2:45pm

Date: January 20, 2015

Instructor: Joe Antonioli – Most course sites at Middlebury are built using either Moodle or WordPress, here we will look at the features and benefits of both services.

 

Exploring SecondLife and 3D Virtual Worlds @ 1pm

Date: January 21, 2015

Instructor: Joe Antonioli – Yes, Middlebury has an island. This workshop will introduce participants to 3d virtual spaces, and their place in education.

 

Crafting Digital Narratives with Scalar @ 2:45pm

Date: January 21, 2015

Instructor: Alicia Peaker – From non-linear storytelling to rich, scholarly annotations, this workshop will encourage new ways of thinking about writing in digital environments. Using a web application called Scalar, you will begin to craft a media-rich digital narrative. Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways. (scalar.usc.edu)

 

Adobe Illustrator @ 1pm

Date: January 22, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – In this workshop, you will learn to use basic editing tools and some fundamental design concepts. The workshop is taught as though it were a class teaching students to design a poster for a class or seminar. It is the same instruction that participants in the Spring Student Seminar receive.

Digital Media Bootcamp 2015

Please sign-up for sessions at http://sites.middlebury.edu/ct/digital-media-bootcamp-2015/

If the session you would like to attend is filled, please contact Joe Antonioli via email jantonio@middlebury.edu

Quicktime, SnapZ Pro, MPEG Streamclip @ 1pm

Date: January 12, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – This workshop will teach you the basic functionality of Apple’s Quicktime, how to use SnapZ Pro to do a screen capture of video, and how to use features of MPEG StreamClip to view and convert video clips.

Adobe InDesign @ 2:45pm

Date: January 12, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – In this workshop, you will learn basic editing tools and design concepts used in desktop publishing. This program is used widely on campus from the layout of Middlebury Magazine to many publications produced by Reprographics.

Intro to Visual Literacy and Presentations @ 1pm

Date: January 13, 2015

Instructor: Joe Antonioli – We will spend time thinking critically about the images that are presented to us, and use this information to create our own visual media.

Adobe Illustrator @ 2:45pm

Date: January 13, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – In this workshop, you will learn to use basic editing tools and some fundamental design concepts. The workshop is taught as though it were a class teaching students to design a poster for a class or seminar. It is the same instruction that participants in the Spring Student Seminar receive.

Copyright, IP and Creative Commons @ 1pm

Date: January 14, 2015

Instructor: Terry Simpkins –

Building Digital Exhibits with Omeka @ 2:45pm

Date: January 14, 2015

Instructor: Alicia Peaker – Create beautiful online exhibits of your art or archival materials with Omeka, an open-source digital archival platform sometimes referred to as “WordPress for museums.” This workshop may also be of interest to faculty who would like to build digital archives or collections in their classes. (omeka.net)

Adobe Photoshop @ 2:45pm

Date: January 15, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – You will learn the basic tools, design concepts, and work flow needed to manipulate photos for your personal or project related use. Concepts such as selection, cropping, rotation, repair, scanning photos for use in Photoshop, and others will be covered.

Adobe InDesign @ 1pm

Date: January 15, 2015

Instructor: Mack Roark – In this workshop, you will learn basic editing tools and design concepts used in desktop publishing. This program is used widely on campus from the layout of Middlebury Magazine to many publications produced by Reprographics.

Contemporary Issues in the Liberal Arts – Winter Term Series

Lunch will be served at each event in the Center for Teaching, Learning & Research 12 – 1 pm. Please RSVP using the sign up form at least two days in advance of the event. Thank you.

Monday, January 12th 2015 11:00-12:00

Teaching with (and about) Digital Technologies

How can students engage critically with technology in the classroom? How can digital assignments further pedagogical goals? Join Jason Mittell (FMC), Carrie Anderson (HARC), and Alicia Peaker (DLA) for a discussion of these questions, and some practical examples of implementing digital technologies in the classroom.

Thursday January 15, 2015, 11:00 – 12:00

Guided Inquiry Learning

In this session, Assistant Professor Glen Ernstrom (BIOL, NSCI) will introduce and explore a student-centered pedagogical strategy that emphasizes deep thinking, deep learning, and the creative process.

Monday January 19, 2015, 11:00 – 12:00

Classroom Discussion Part II: Navigating Controversial Topics

When controversial or difficult topics become central parts of classroom conversations they are likely to engage student’s deeply held preconceptions and convictions and may arouse powerful emotional responses. These exchanges may become heated, but a thoughtful, well‐facilitated discussion can have many benefits as students get the opportunity to learn from their peers and explore new ways of understanding the world. Moreover, the encouragement of mutual respect during the course of disagreement can encourage students to feel more confident as they enter into difficult conversations in the future.

See our full schedule here: http://sites.middlebury.edu/ctlrprogramming/